Social Media RSS Feed https://research-jobs.net/rss en BA (Hons) Media & Communications https://research-jobs.net/program/ba-hons-media-communications-1429787 <h3>Course overview</h3> <p>Bringing together media practice and communications theory, this degree covers a broad spectrum of critical perspectives on the media, and will introduce you to a range of contemporary media practices.</p> <h3>Why study BA Media & Communications at Goldsmiths?</h3> <ul> <li>You will study in one of the UK's and the world's top media and communications departments.</li> </ul> <ul> <li>You'll be taught by leading names in media, communications and cultural studies.</li> </ul> <ul> <li>We concentrate on high quality lectures and small group work, and all our teaching takes place on one purpose-built site.</li> </ul> <ul> <li>On practice modules you'll be taught by industry professionals engaged in TV, film, journalism, radio, photography, scriptwriting, short fiction, illustration, interactive media and animation.</li> </ul> <ul> <li>You'll have access to industry-standard practice facilities, including TV/film, radio and photography studios, digital video and audio editing suites, and animation software and hardware.</li> </ul> <ul> <li>Our close links to the media industry bring you into regular contact with media professionals. You will have the opportunity to apply for an internship in the media as part of the course.</li> </ul> <ul> <li>We regularly host debates and talks by international figures in media and cultural research and the media industry; recent guests have included Danny Boyle, Gurinder Chadha and Noel Clark.</li> </ul> <ul> <li>You'll be taught alongside students from all over the world and with diverse cultural experiences that enrich the department and the learning experience.</li> </ul> <ul> <li>You'll develop skills that you can use throughout your career whether in the media industries or elsewhere. Our recent graduates are now working as television producers, news readers, editors, journalists... Others have gone into a whole range of careers such as research, teaching and law.</li> </ul> <ul> <li>We're ranked third in the UK for the quality and impact of our research (Research Excellence Framework), which means that by studying in the department you'll be working alongside academics who are leaders in their fields. </li> </ul> <p>Contact the department</p> <h2>What you'll study</h2> <h3>Overview</h3> <p>The degree consists of 50% media <strong>theory</strong> and 50% media <strong>practice</strong>. We aim to provide an inspirational learning experience in which theory and practice influence and enrich each other in the production of original creative and intellectual work.</p> <p>Far more than just a media degree this programme incorporates philosophical perspectives on technology and human life as well as sociological approaches to media production.</p> <p>We look at issues of identity through critical race studies, queer theory and critiques of post-feminism. We investigate global screen cultures and also the role of news in democracy. All of this, together with critical, creative practice in production equips our students to be the thinking media practitioners of the future.</p> <h3>Year 1 (credit level 4)</h3> <p><strong>Media Theory</strong></p> <p>In the first year, the theory element introduces you to the study of verbal and visual languages, and encourages you to assess changes in the media. You'll be acquainted with debates surrounding the term 'culture', and will look at how experiences of gender, age and race affect our understanding of the concept. You'll also examine various media texts, and take a module that will address theories of society and approaches to the modern state as they relate to media. </p> <p>You take the following compulsory 15 credit compulsory modules:</p> <p>Year 1 Media Theory modulesModule title</p> <table> <thead> <tr> </tr> </thead> <tbody> <tr> <td>15 credits <p>Much attention is focused on today’s technologies, programmes, websites, innovations and media uses. Although this is understandable, it contributes to a neglect of other issues that are essential in understanding contemporary media dynamics – in particular the historical evolution of the media and the political frameworks and consequences that accompanied this evolution. This module provides you with ways of thinking about media history and media politics and is designed to contextualise more contemporary debates about media industries, practices and texts. While the module focuses largely on the UK media system, you are encouraged to reflect on the relevance of these models to international media systems with which you may be more familiar.</p> </td> <td>15 credits</td> </tr> <tr> <td>15 credits <p><em>Cultural studies assumes that history - its shape, its seams, its outcomes - is never guaranteed. As a result, doing cultural studies takes work, including the kind of work deciding what cultural studies is, of making cultural studies over again and again. Cultural studies constructs itself as it faces new questions and takes up new positions. In that sense, doing cultural studies is always risky and never totally comfortable. It is fraught with inescapable tensions (as well as with real pleasures). </em>(Lawrence Grossberg, <em>We Gotta Get Out of This Place, Routledge, 1992: 18</em>)</p> <p>If we want to trace the ‘history’ of cultural studies in the UK, we have to go back to adult education classes in the 1950s and ‘60s, where students and their tutors embarked on the challenging task of questioning what constituted culture, social distinction, nationhood and other forms of identity. Cultural studies began to put a spotlight on everyday cultural practices which had hitherto been regarded as inferior or which contradicted established notions of what constituted culture itself. In so doing, cultural studies research has uncovered the richness of daily life for sections of society whose lives had not been deemed worthy of study or who had been dismissed as ‘uncultured’. Since this period, the field of cultural studies has shown how apparently self-evident concepts and beliefs have strong ideological underpinnings dependent on the wielding of social, economic and political power. In this sense, cultural studies is a political project which is not only interested in presenting alternative definitions of culture but also in investigating the power structures which shape them. Cultural studies provides us with the opportunity to interrogate notions of national identity, such as ‘Britishness’; to explore attitudes and practices which perpetuate social inequality and to understand how key markers of identity such as gender, race, class and sexuality are cultural formations with complex and continually shifting histories.</p> <p>Cultural studies is now widely taught, not only in the UK but also in the US, Australia, and many other countries. Due to its immense variety and liveliness, it has been described somewhat humorously by Colin Sparks as a ‘rag-bag of ideas, methods and concerns’ (Storey, 1996: 14) it is nevertheless united by two main concerns:</p> <ol> <li>The study of culture perceived as a ‘whole way of life’;</li> <li>The examination of the political, economic and social structures which shape culture (but which are at the same time <em>part of</em> this culture)</li> </ol> <p>One of the aspects of the political nature of cultural studies is the constant need for self-examination. As Stuart Hall, one of the most influential figures in the field, has argued, cultural studies ‘is a project that is always open to that which it doesn’t yet know, to that which it can’t yet name’ (in Grossberg et al, 1992: 278). Put simply, cultural studies can be described as a ‘project in the making’ in which meaning and identity are constantly in being renegotiated.</p> <p>This module serves as an introduction to the study of culture and to the emergence of cultural studies. It starts with a general introduction to the idea of culture, and some of the problems associated with defining it. It also sketches the context within which cultural studies emerged from the Centre for Contemporary Cultural Studies (CCCS) in Birmingham in the late 1960s. We will take a close critical look at some of the key texts and theories that emerged from the Centre in the 1970s. This will be followed by some detailed analyses of a number of ideas associated with cultural studies - identity, hybridity, essentialism, resistance - and a number of cultural products and practices – soap operas, shopping, music and city life.</p> </td> <td>15 credits</td> </tr> <tr> <td>15 credits <p>How do the media shape our outlook on life, and the way we think about our place in the world?  What influence do the media have over us and how might we understand, access or influence these networks of power? What governs the interactions between the media and citizens?  Key Debates in Media Studies looks into various approaches to these questions focusing on two main themes: control and resistance. </p> <p><strong>Issues of media control, structure and policy</strong>, and the ways in which media are ‘framed’ for us by powerful interests.</p> <p><strong>The ways in which people are active in relation to media</strong>: producing their own meanings, resisting dominant structures and creating new types of content.</p> </td> <td>15 credits</td> </tr> <tr> <td>15 credits <p>Over the past 120 years, moving images have developed into a major aesthetic and social force of our times. Our realities both past and present are consumed by audiovisual mediations. Our imaginations and desires are built on filmic fictions. We mirror ourselves through our doubles on screen. But how do moving images actually engage us? What is their language? How do they affect us as human beings with a body, a psyche and social awareness? What does it means to have a cinematic form of aesthetics, and how is this currently being redefined in the age of the digital?</p> <p>This module serves as an introduction into the theorising and analysis of film and other audiovisual media. It presents an overview of the historical development of cinematic modes of expression and experience and their key conceptualisations. Specific questions pursued range from the realism of cinema to the expressionistic powers of montage, from cinema's primal qualities as an immersive embodied experience to narrative, story-telling forms, as well as from the classic nature of film spectatorship to the novel forms of engagement emerging today with 3D, VR and AR.</p> </td> <td>15 credits</td> </tr> <tr> <td>15 credits <p>The module starts by looking at some of the different ways in which artists have used media and technology across different historical periods. Through this, we introduce aesthetic concerns to the study of media, raising questions about cultural appreciation, value and taste, but also about social and political issues concerning art. You will learn to be critical towards many forms of media art – both old and new. The notion of ‘art’ as a unified field of specialist cultural production is then put into question in the context of the wider discussions of creativity and amateur media practices. By studying contemporary forms of media production via social media, open web, etc., we consider whether, in the age of online media and cheap digital technology, everyone is potentially an artist. Blurring the boundary between ‘theory’ and ‘practice’, the module attempts to get you to 'think about media' and 'make media' as part of the same classroom experience and module assignment.</p> </td> <td>15 credits</td> </tr> </tbody> </table> <p><strong>Media Practice</strong></p> <p>Compulsory media practice modules include an introduction to five of the media practices on offer, and your first media production option, in which you’ll work on a small-scale project.</p> <h3>Year 2 (credit level 5)</h3> <p><strong>Media Theory</strong></p> <p>In the second year you take theory modules covering a range of approaches to the study of communications and the media. You'll look at theories of postmodernity, identity and globalisation; be introduced to differing psychological perspectives on the analysis of culture and communications; consider cultural theory; and investigate concepts of audience. </p> <p>You take the following core modules:</p> <p>Year 2 core modules</p> <table> <thead> <tr> </tr> </thead> <tbody> <tr> <td>15 credits <p>This module will examine the place of ‘experience’ in thinking about our self-formation. What does it mean to ‘know ourselves’ and what role does psychological thinking, norms and concepts play in this process of knowing? We will examine arguments which suggest that psychology, as a body of knowledge and set of practices, does not actually reveal or disclose who we are, but plays a central role in constructing whom we take ourselves to be. The approach to psychology we will take throughout the module is deeply historical, examining the place of psychology in systems of governance and regulation, and how we might think about our own self-formation in light of this perspective. The module will explore arguments that suggest psychology is a science of population management, rather than a science of the self or the individual. One particular issue we will examine is the emergence of ‘the individual’ as an object and target of a process that philosopher Michel Foucault called Governmentality.  </p> <p>This issue will be explored by interrogating the relationships between psychology, media and popular culture, and systems of government and regulation. During the module, we will identify events where psychological ideas, norms and concepts are produced, and to think about the possibilities and problems with such forms of psychologisation.</p> <p>We will begin by considering the rise of ‘therapeutic cultures’ and their role in the production of particular norms of personhood; specifically the ‘fiction of autonomous selfhood’. The student will then be introduced to some of the key concepts which will be used throughout the module to further interrogate the performative basis of psychological knowledge and its circulation within media cultures. These concepts will include; discourse, Governmentality, genealogy, subjectivity, subjectification, power, fantasy and desire.  We will explore how Foucault’s power/knowledge coupling produces a perspective on power relations that challenges more traditional notions of ‘sovereign’ power, centred on the polity or the State.</p> <p>The module will encourage students to interrogate their own self-formation and autobiographies and help to situate these narratives in relation to concepts such as power, discourse, desire, imagination, affect and corporeality. The module will extend the usefulness of the concept of subjectivity by exploring both Foucauldian and psychoanalytic approaches to subjectivity and illustrate their application by exploring certain themes and issues which will include: makeover culture, body-language (specifically facial expression), the emotions, mass psychology, makeover culture, televisual affect, positive psychology and the science of happiness, and historical aspects of the ‘media effects’ debates. We will also consider how we might begin to understand the complex relationships between sexuality, class, race and gender in relation to the performative force of communication practices such as magazines, film, television, etc.</p> </td> <td>15 credits</td> </tr> <tr> <td>15 credits <p>The purpose of this course is to provide students with a basic knowledge of the thought of some of most prominent social theorists (Marx, Weber, Durkheim and Simmel) and to explore how these works have influenced our understandings of the media, modernity and power. It should be evident that whilst media theorists have their own particular focal concerns, in many cases they are responding to problems posed within this classic tradition. The social theory examined in this course asks crucial questions both about the nature of society – power, stratification, agency, regulation, identity and spectacle – as well as about the media’s status as a key instrument of social reproduction. The course thus provides a theoretical map on which to locate some of the key issues confronted in media, communication and cultural studies.</p> <p>The course will be divided into two different parts. In the first half we will explore the different contributions made by Marx, Weber, Durkheim and Simmel to our understanding of modernity. In the second half of the course, we confront a more contemporary version of social theory that critically challenges some of the foundations of Western modern thought by looking at postmodernism, race and ethnicity, gender, and globalisation.</p> <p>In order to emphasise the link between social theory and media studies, sessions will address specific cultural or media-related phenomena connected to the sociological topic under discussion. We will, for example, investigate a range of issues including ‘McDonaldisation’, branding, reality television, celebrity and spectacle.</p> </td> <td>15 credits</td> </tr> </tbody> </table> <p>Year 2 option modules</p> <table> <thead> <tr> </tr> </thead> <tbody> <tr> <td>15 credits <p>This module provides a critical and conceptual vocabulary for understanding some of the key dynamics of social and cultural change, with particular reference to the large social institutions of modernity, the family and sexuality, and the changing world of work. In effect we track significant transformations of society from the domestic sphere to the field of employment. Processes of individualisation have undermined the social welfare framework which was a hallmark of the post-war period. While some sociologists including Ulrich Beck and Anthony Giddens claim that this disembedding of individuals away from communities and from long-term attachments and commitments based on family and work-based identities are actually the outcome of welfare provisions and public investment in education, health and so on, by which means individuals are now able to ‘live the life they choose’, others including Bauman, Rose and Foucault argue that individualisation is a process which shifts social and economic responsibility from the state to the individual. In addition to this we could suggest that in times of Euro-crisis and austerity we are moving to a post-welfare era, which will to some extent upset or de-stabilise the thesis of Giddens and Beck. In a sense has the individualised society become fully neo-liberalised? People are now expected to be self-reliant , they must self-manage, and indeed the new role of ‘Governmentality’ is to encourage this ethos by means of self-help books, guidance manuals, ‘personal advisors’ and so on.</p> <p>The module examines these processes and discusses their consequences, what kind of ‘subjects’ are we now becoming? How does the ethos of individualisation operate in the context of globalisation? What are the types of production processes underpinning the more individualised society? What is meant by post-Fordism? What are the consequences of individualisation for men and women, for young people, for ethnic minorities? Who are the winners and the losers of the ‘network society’? What exactly is meant by ‘neo-liberalism’ and how has this credo had an impact in social and political life? In the first few sessions we paint a wider picture considering life, love, intimacy and family life in the individualised society, we then move towards a more close-up focus on the new workplace, looking for example at the rise of new forms of self-employment in the creative economy, and at the rise of the ‘crafting’ movement. Overall we are reflecting on the ‘future of work’ in an individualised society.</p> </td> <td>15 credits</td> </tr> <tr> <td>15 credits <p>An ever increasing portion of a waking lives is spent interacting with media screens. This is an accepted and routine fact of life disrupted only occasionally by sporadic media panics about our addiction to screens that hint at an undercurrent of disquiet we generally suppress. But what do we actually know about these screen interactions and experiences? How might we think critically about the diversity of screen interfaces, environments and media formats with which we interact on a daily basis? How do contemporary screens and viewing situations relate to a longer history of screen practice and spectatorship focused on the circulation and display of moving images?</p> <p>This is a module about how we live with and experience media screens and screen-based media. We look to make the familiar strange by juxtaposing screen interfaces, practices and venues from different historical periods and by thinking through a range of ideas about spectatorship across the disciplines of media, film and visual culture. We will examine how the media institutions and technologies that deliver and display screen-based moving image forms, produce the environments we inhabit and organize our visual and auditory senses, whilst considering how we negotiate these spaces and conditions. We will think about the orientation of our bodies towards screens, which are both physical, material objects and surfaces on which impermanent images flow: the different possibilities involved in sitting still or walking, being with others or alone, touching or being ‘touched’ by, holding a screen in our hands or reaching out towards one on the horizon. Media screens and screen based media construct publics and make public space. Screen media spectatorship implicates us in ethical dilemmas as we bear witness to the distant suffering of others and acquires uncanny resonance as the dead are brought back life.</p> <p>This module aims to equip students to think critically about how we see moving images as well as what we see. It encourages students to make connections between theories and concepts from a range of disciplinary perspectives and in their assessed work apply these to specific examples of media screens and/or screen-based media that they have chosen.</p> </td> <td>15 credits</td> </tr> <tr> <td>15 credits <p>This module asks students to think about the ways in which our economic lives shape and are shaped by society and culture. How do social and cultural forces influence our understanding of wealth, poverty, and inequality? How is economic news reported, and why is it often difficult to understand? How might technological developments such as digital currencies or platform-based forms of exchange change our economic behaviour? How do financial advice columns shape our understanding of the ‘good life’?</p> <p>This module explores the role of communication and culture in economic life through a range of theoretical approaches and case studies. It encourages students to think about the economy both as a mediated phenomenon – something that is represented in the news, in culture and in everyday life in a variety of ways – and as a set of mediating concepts and ideas (‘markets’, ‘value’, ‘worth’) that shape the way we understand the world.</p> </td> <td>15 credits</td> </tr> <tr> <td>15 credits <p>This module encourages students to reflect on the contribution of the media to collective and individual memories of war and social conflict. Media representations of both historic and recent conflicts, social movements and popular struggles play a significant part in the way these events are subsequently remembered and commemorated. Media portrayals are also significant in terms of psychological affect and emotional responses to violence upheaval and social change.</p> <p>The module will equip students with the skills to understand the relationship between symbolic, mediated aspects of violence and conflict and the underlying social, political and economic processes which may be lost in the process of remembering. The module will provide students with skills to analyse visual and textual representations of war and social conflict in a variety of media material including newspapers, feature and documentary film, archive newsreels and photographs and digital sources.</p> <p>Following the theoretical introduction in Week One, the module will explore the importance of memory in relation to some key experiences and events over the past century. We will then shift to a more thematic discussion of how memory affects experiences according to race, gender, sexuality and class. However, throughout the module the impact of these categories upon memory will remain an important element of our work.</p> </td> <td>15 credits</td> </tr> <tr> <td>15 credits <p>Television has undergone crucial transformations since its establishment in the mid-20<sup>th</sup> century. From the analogue ‘age of scarcity’ characterised by a limited number of national channels, television has grown into a commercial multichannel ecology and further expanded into a multiplatform, digital environment characterised by post-broadcast network transmission. But while rapid expansion of the spectrum and diminishing costs of entry have contributed to how the medium and its future development is perceived, the established political and economic patterns continue to have their stronghold. The increased transnational trade contributed to a reconfiguration of the economic landscape of television and while promising a more global medium, they have hardly redefined its inherently national character. This module will focus on contemporary debates about television as a cultural form, critically examining its continuities and changes of its economic and political context. While the module will rely on mainly British and US examples, it welcomes examples and comparisons with other national contexts.</p> </td> <td>15 credits</td> </tr> </tbody> </table> <p><strong>Media Practice</strong></p> <p>Practice modules introduce you to media production in a different area to the one you studied in year one.  You'll apply production skills in the creation of small-scale projects, and develop critical skills through the analysis of examples and of work produced in each area. You then choose a practice area in which to specialise.</p> <p>You take:</p> <table> <tbody> <tr> <td>30 credits <p>An introduction to media production in a different area to the one you studied in the second year. You apply production skills in the creation of small-scale projects, and develop critical skills through the analysis of examples and of work produced in each area.</p> </td> <td>30 credits</td> </tr> </tbody> </table> <p><strong>Media Theory</strong></p> <p>You can choose any combination of options to the value of 60 credits. Options offered recently have included:</p> <p>Year 3 option modules</p> <table> <thead> <tr> </tr> </thead> <tbody> <tr> <td>15 credits <p>This module examines the actors and communication processes involved in contemporary political communication. It combines theoretical insights and empirical information from the fields of media studies, journalism, sociology and political science. It mainly focuses on democracies, particularly in the US and UK, but literature and examples are also drawn from other types of political system and country.</p> <p>Weekly topics combine standard political communication topics and contemporary examples, with discussions of related theory and concepts. The following topics are covered: The crisis of politics and media in established democracies; mass media and the news production process; political parties, citizen relations and political marketing; the production of news and the future for traditional print and broadcast news media; media effects and influences, and citizen engagement and participation; historical and cultural elements of political communication, and digital politics and communication. In addition, key case study areas will be explored, including: the 2015 UK Election and EU Referendum; the economics of austerity and financialisation; media management and mediatisation of politics; and health and welfare policy.</p> <p>Theories and concepts drawn upon include: Theories of democracy (from weak, representative to direct, deliberative); public sphere theory (national, parliamentary, local, global, online, and counter); Political economy and related critiques of capitalist democracy; Work, organisation, professionalization and bureaucracy; mediatisation, popular culture and politics; Primary definition, media consecration, and celebrity; New technologies, technological determinism and social shaping.</p> <p>Much of the material for this module is highly contemporary, so students are encouraged to maintain an awareness of current developments in political communication in the UK and elsewhere, through newspapers, television, radio and the internet. Students are very much encouraged to bring contemporary examples into the seminar discussions and their essays.</p> </td> <td>15 credits</td> </tr> <tr> <td>15 credits <p>This module will examine how histories of Western imperialism have shaped the landscapes of the present. Our task is to explore how contemporary racial and national formations (ideas about ‘Britishness’, ‘whiteness’, and so on) exist in a complex and intimate relationship to longer histories of empire.</p> <p>In addition to introducing key concepts from critical race and postcolonial studies, lectures will also offer phenomenological interpretations of how race structures the present often by receding into the background, as well as drawing on theories of affect and emotion to explore how security regimes become racial regimes.</p> <p>Our concern is with how histories of empire ‘get under the skin,’ and set reading include works that reflect on the experience of being or becoming strangers, or ‘bodies out of place.’ We attend to the intersection between race, gender and sexuality throughout.</p> </td> <td>15 credits</td> </tr> <tr> <td>15 credits <p>In this module students will be introduced to a series of sociological questions about the city and urban life from a perspective which focuses on public culture, consumer culture and everyday life. There is an emphasis on lived space, patterns of housing, spaces of leisure and enjoyment, spaces for multi-culturalism and for sharing public provided resources such as parks, libraries, schools and open spaces, as well as detailed considerations of changes within the retail landscape. The aim will be to become familiar with the concepts and ideas developed by cultural geographers, social and cultural theorists, by feminists, by post-colonialist scholars, by artists, writers and film-makers about the growth of urbanism, about the sensations and subjective states of intensity which city life generates. The module will also adopt a historical approach charting the rise of urban modernity, the development of shopping and the department store, and it will consider the city as the space for crime, for prostitution and for gang culture. We will also examine processes of migration to the city, and to the way in which power relations in the city result in boundaries, barrios, ghettos, enclaves and fortresses. We will ask questions about the urban workforce, the new service sector, and jobs such as nannies and ‘baristas’. Cities have long been laboratories for sociologists and ethnographers and we will critically examine some of the results of these activities, with a view to producing short ‘urban diaries’ based on close observation of local neighbourhoods or districts in London, e.g. Changes to the East End through gentrification and development. With this in mind we will do an afternoon field trip later in the term to look at the old and the ‘new’ Kings Cross.</p> <p>The wider conceptual frames for this module are drawn from postmodern theories of space (Jameson, Soja, Massey), from the writing on space by Foucault, from anthropological ideas of everyday life (de Certeau) from sociological studies of urban neighbourhoods (Wacquant), and from sociologists who examine urban micro-economies of culture and creativity (McRobbie). There will be the chance to debate the work of Richard Florida and to reflect on the ideas which inform ‘creative city’ policies. In the first 5 weeks we adopt an approach informed by cultural history and social theory. In the second half we pay close attention to the rise of the ‘creative city’, to processes of gentrification and to neighbourhood politics. Throughout the module students will be encouraged to draw on their own experience of urban culture, as well as draw on the module material to develop a greater understanding of the cities and urban environments in which they grew up.</p> </td> <td>15 credits</td> </tr> <tr> <td>15 credits <p>Why does music matter? What is its value? What makes music a distinctive form of communication? In what ways does music enhance people’s lives, and produce forms of individual and collective flourishing? Conversely, how can music reinforce social hierarchies? How does music link to questions of social power, notably in terms of class, ethnicity and gender, in relation to its production and consumption? How can music lead to individual and collective forms of flourishing?</p> <p>This course explores how musical meanings are conveyed and understood and how this is mediated through the cultures and technologies of production and consumption. We will consider how music communicates mood and meaning, not only through associated imagery and the lyrical content of songs, but as sound itself. We will also think about the processes that link production, circulation and consumption, as well as explore the ways that music connects with individual and collective identities.</p> <p>Underlying the option are a series of wider questions about how we might research, analyse and understand the complex of sounds, words and images that constitute contemporary popular and many other kinds of music. How and in what ways may we argue that music can express, influence and affect human actions and perceptions? How are beliefs, values and identities encoded and communicated as part of a collective experience or to individual listening subjects? How is what we listen to mediated by technologies and what affects does this has? How do we analyse and talk about musical sound when this often considered as having little to do with representation?</p> <p>Such questions have received relatively little attention in media, communication and cultural studies, and many of these issues remain under-researched. Hence, you are encouraged to draw on your own personal experience of music in everyday life and to make use of this material in connection with some of the theoretical approaches under discussion during seminars (as well as others you will have come across in your reading and on other courses).This option is more theoretically demanding than it might initially appear, as it entails thinking critically about a number of everyday musical and sonic experiences that are often taken for granted. It also requires you to both bring a range of critical ideas to your analysis of music and musicians as well as musical examples (on CD, phone, mp3 file etc) to play to your seminar group. You are encouraged to read widely for seminar discussion and when writing essays, and to make connections to a number of relevant and related theoretical debates outside of the immediate popular music literature.</p> </td> <td>15 credits</td> </tr> <tr> <td>15 credits <p>This module will examine the place of the ‘body’ in contemporary social and cultural theory taking a number of case studies as examples. In recent years across a range of academic disciplines, from sociology, anthropology, cultural studies and psychology, there has been a move away from approaching the body as a pre-given biological entity or substance, to explore the body as a process. This shifts inquiry from asking not ‘what a body is?’, but rather ‘what can a body do’? ‘What could bodies become’? This work privileges the materiality of the body, as well as introducing creative energy and motion into our understandings of corporeality. It also directs and extends our focus away from anthropocentric understandings of the body (ie. that the human body is distinctly ‘human’) and orients our examinations of corporeality to include species bodies, psychic bodies, machinic bodies, vitalist bodies and other-worldly bodies. These bodies may not conform to our expectations of clearly defined boundaries between the psychological, social, biological, ideological, economic and technical, and may not even resemble the molar body in any shape or form.</p> <p>Thus many of the dualisms that have circulated across academic disciplines have been dismantled and troubled. These include contrasts between nature and culture, the individual and society, the mind and body, the interior and exterior, and the human and animal/machine. This work has emerged for example in relation to debates surrounding bio and digital technologies, body image and eating disorders, gender performativity, animal/ human relations, affective communication, the senses and mediated perception, health and illness, psychiatric and therapy cultures, the emotions, affect and feeling, the importance of engaging with science, including the contemporary neurosciences to name some just some examples. The question is how do we, as humanities scholars, engage with the body and debates surrounding the body and what relevance might this have for understanding our relationship to media practices and technologies, and particularly for how we might theorise mediation?</p> <p>This module will provide a critical forum to reflect on these issues, and will provide students from the humanities with a critical understanding of theories of society, culture and communications, which recognize that the body has a materiality and cannot simply be collapsed into text, discourse and signifying activity. This work also explores the complex and layered relationships between scientific narratives/practices, cultural narratives/ practices and our own autobiographies/ embodied practices. The module will explore to what extent we need to talk about embodiment, rather than the body in any fixed way.</p> </td> <td>15 credits</td> </tr> <tr> <td>15 credits <p>The module investigates the nature of media law and ethical regulation for media practitioners primarily in the UK, but with some comparison with the situation in the USA and references to the experiences of media communicators in other countries. The students are directed towards an analysis of media law, as it exists, the ethical debates concerning what the law ought to be, and the historical development of legal and regulatory controls of communication. The theoretical underpinning involves a module of learning the subject of media jurisprudence- the study of the philosophy of media law, media ethicology (the study of the knowledge of ethics/morality in media communication), and media ethicism (the belief systems in the political context that influence journalistic conduct and content). The module evaluates media law and regulation in terms of its social and cultural context. It is taught in one and a half hour lectures and one-hour seminars that involve the discussion of multi-media examples of media communication considered legally and/or morally problematical. Media Law and Ethics is a dynamic subject with dramatic and significant changes and developments occurring from year to year addressing acute issues in journalism, current affairs and politics. As a result, the module content is substantially revised year after year in response to these developments.</p> </td> <td>15 credits</td> </tr> <tr> <td>15 credits <p>This module aims to explore how the media operate as a focus of ritual action, symbolic hierarchy and symbolic conflict. In particular, it explores to what extent theoretical frameworks already developed in anthropology and social theory can help us analyse contemporary media and mediated public life.</p> <p>This module explores various approaches, theoretical and empirical, to understand what might broadly be called the ritual dimensions of contemporary media. Among the questions the module addresses are the following:</p> <p>1. What can anthropological theories of culture, ritual and power contribute to the understanding of contemporary media?2. What might we mean by the terms ‘ritual’ and ‘ritualisation’ in relation to media?3. How do we analyse those times when media production and usage depart from the ordinary and every day, and take on larger social resonances, for example the national broadcasting of major public events?4. How is the growth of celebrity culture connected to questions of social power?5. How should we interpret the media’s claims to represent ‘reality’, for example in the proliferating genre of ‘reality TV’?6. Why do non-media people want to appear in or on the media, and with what consequences do they do so?7. How is media’s power connected with the practices of state and corporate power and with the latter’s use of media (including for surveillance)? 8. Are media’s ritual dimensions played out differently in different media cultures?9. How do media rituals affect contemporary public cultures, and with what ethical consequences?</p> <p>Lectures move from introductory material and theoretical concepts (in the early weeks) to specific aspects of contemporary media production (in the last two-thirds of the term). Students will be encouraged in seminar discussion and in their written work to apply the theoretical concepts introduced in the module to the analysis of specific examples.</p> </td> <td>15 credits</td> </tr> <tr> <td>15 credits <p>This module looks at the rise of promotional culture (public relations, advertising, marketing and branding) and promotional intermediaries and their impact on society. The first part of the module will look at the history of promotional culture and will offer some conflicting theoretical approaches with which to view its development.</p> <p>These include: professional/ industrial, economic, political economy, Post-Fordist, audience, consumer society, risk society, and postmodern perspectives. The second part will look at specific case areas of promotional culture. These are in: fashion and taste, technological commodities, popular culture (film TV, music), celebrities and public figures, political parties, and financial markets. In each of these areas questions will be asked about the influence of promotional practices on the production, communication and consumption of ideas and products as well as larger discourses, fashions/ genres and socio-economic trends.</p> </td> <td>15 credits</td> </tr> <tr> <td>15 credits <p>Since the beginning of moving images, the world has moved from industrial and imperial to digital and global. Among the political movements that have been most important in the period since the invention of the movies are (neo)liberalism, Marxism, fascism, nationalism, feminism and anti-colonial struggles. These trends are inescapably bound up in the technologies, techniques and forms of the moving image and the sound arts, from the early days of cinema to contemporary handheld and immersive media. This module investigates the politics of these forms and technologies as attempts at controlling the dispositions of minds and bodies and as struggles for their emancipation. It will address a broad range of topics from the power of sounds, images and visual apparatuses in the 20th and 21st centuries to the relationship of politics and aesthetics, the problem of democracy, and ideology critique.</p> <p>"Mankind, which in Homer’s time was an object of contemplation for the Olympian gods, now is one for itself. Its self-alienation has reached such a degree that it can experience its own destruction as an aesthetic pleasure of the first order. This is the situation of politics which Fascism is rendering aesthetic. Communism responds by politicizing art."<em>Walter Benjamin, The Work of Art in the Age of Mechanical Reproduction. 1936.</em></p> </td> <td>15 credits</td> </tr> <tr> <td>15 credits <p>Many of the current cutting edge developments in social and mobile media take place in what is often referred to as the global south. Innovations such as mobile money (see for example platforms such as M-Pesa and G-Cash) and crowdsourcing platforms (such as Ushahidi) have emerged from countries such as the Philippines and Kenya where over 25 per cent of the country’s GNP flows through M-Pesa. With over 1.39 billion SMS sent daily the Philippines is commonly described as the texting capital of the world. But how can we understand the social consequences of social and mobile media (and the wider media environments they are part of)? Are new communication technologies opportunities for social change, as it is often claimed, or do they simply amplify existing inequalities?</p> <p>This module takes an ethnographic, grounded approach to understanding the social uses and social consequences of social media in non-western contexts. Theoretically, the module brings together the interconnected literatures on globalization and social shaping of technology while we will also address contemporary debates on digital media, consumption, social change and power. Empirically, the module will draw on media ethnographies from China, Ghana, Jamaica, Kenya, Malaysia, Nigeria, The Philippines and Trinidad and will address a number of substantive topics such as socialities, intimacy and parenting. The 15 credit version of the module will focus primarily on the impact of social / mobile media for personal relationships. Ultimately, rather than reporting on a collection of international case studies, the module aims to draw on these non-Western contexts to revisit assumptions about social media as well as about key concepts in social science, such as intimacy and parenting. We will showcase the local appropriations of digital technologies and in turn explore whether these are catalyzing processes of social change or entrenching existing power asymmetries. The tension between cultural particularism and social change is central to the module which will end with a broader theorisation of social media.</p> </td> <td>15 credits</td> </tr> <tr> <td>15 credits <p>Drawing on a range of interdisciplinary perspectives (including cultural studiesand anthropology) this module will address the role of ‘tele’-technologies (technologies of distance - such as the telegraph, telephone, and television) in constructing the post-modern geography of the contemporary era, The module takes a non ‘media-centric’ perspective, focusing on the differenthistorical and cultural contexts within which these technologies operate and on the articulation of material and virtual geographies We begin by focusing on the ‘moral panics’ that have always accompanied each new medium - from the radio, to the cinema, etc. The module highlights the role of what we have come to know as ‘television’ - as the most important medium of the last half century, with a particular focus on its contexts and modes of consumption. The question of technological change will be approached from a historical perspective, for instance, in relationto the late 19th century – as a period featuring a particularly rapid rate of technological change, compared with our own times. We shall review a range of micro-studies of the household (and public) uses of communications and information technologies, and the module will offer a critical approach to the futurological discourses concerning the supposed powers and effects of today’s ‘new’ communications technologies. We conclude by examining the role of various media (big and small) in processes of identity/boundary construction (at different geographical scales) within the broader context of processes of globalisation. We will also address the role of the media in articulating the private and public spheres, in the construction of national,disaporic and transnational identities, and in relation to the various mobilities (not only of information, but also of people and commodities) that characterise our era of ‘time-space compression’.</p> </td> <td>15 credits</td> </tr> <tr> <td>30 credits <p>The dissertation is an 8-10,000 word research project on a media-related topic of your choice. It provides an opportunity to work independently and in a self-directed manner on a subject of longstanding interest or that you have encountered during your studies. Your research topic must be located within the field of media and communications and should ideally draw upon at least one of the theoretical models introduced on the department’s degree programmes. You will be encouraged to undertake primary research of media texts or undertake research interviews to provide material for your case-study. Support for your dissertation will be provided by regular meetings with a supervisor – a member of academic staff who will have knowledge relevant to your chosen topic.</p> </td> <td>30 credits</td> </tr> </tbody> </table> <p><strong>Media Practice</strong></p> <p>You undertake the research, planning and production of a major project or a portfolio of work in the practice area in which you specialised in Year 2 (60 credits).</p> <h3>Teaching style</h3> <p>This programme is taught through scheduled learning - a mixture of lectures, seminars and workshops. You’ll also be expected to undertake a significant amount of independent study. This includes carrying out required and additional reading, preparing topics for discussion, and producing essays or project work.</p> <p>The following information gives an indication of the typical proportions of learning and teaching for each year of this programme*:</p> <ul> <li>Year 1 - 20% scheduled learning, 80% independent learning</li> <li>Year 2 - 17% scheduled learning, 83% independent learning</li> <li>Year 3 - 19% scheduled learning, 81% independent learning</li> </ul> <h3>How you’ll be assessed</h3> <p>You’ll be assessed by a variety of methods, depending on your module choices. These include coursework assignments such as extended essays, reports, presentations, practice-based projects or essays/logs, group projects and reflective essays, as well as seen and unseen written examinations.</p> <p>The following information gives an indication of how you can typically expect to be assessed on each year of this programme*:</p> <ul> <li>Year 1 - 75% coursework, 25% practical</li> <li>Year 2 - 98% coursework, 3% practical</li> <li>Year 3 - 100% coursework</li> </ul> <p>*Please note that these are averages are based on enrolments for 2018/19. Each student’s time in teaching, learning and assessment activities will differ based on individual module choices. Find out more about how this information is calculated.</p> <h3>Credits and levels of learning</h3> <p>An undergraduate honours degree is made up of 360 credits – 120 at Level 4, 120 at Level 5 and 120 at Level 6. If you are a full-time student, you will usually take Level 4 modules in the first year, Level 5 in the second, and Level 6 modules in your final year. A standard module is worth 30 credits. Some programmes also contain 15-credit half modules or can be made up of higher-value parts, such as a dissertation or a Major Project.</p> <p>Download the programme specification. If you would like an earlier version of the programme specification, please contact the Quality Office.</p> <p>Please note that due to staff research commitments not all of these modules may be available every year.</p> <h2>Entry requirements</h2> <p>We accept the following qualifications:</p> <p><strong>A-level:</strong> BBB<strong>International Baccalaureate:</strong> 33 points overall with Three HL subjects at 655 <strong>Access:</strong> Pass with 45 Level 3 credits including 30 Distinctions and a number of merits/passes in subject-specific modules<strong>Scottish qualifications:</strong> BBBBC (Higher) or BBC (Advanced Higher)<strong>European Baccalaureate:</strong> 75%</p> <h3>International qualifications</h3> <p>If English isn’t your first language, you will need an IELTS score (or equivalent English language qualification) of <strong>6.0 with a 6.0 in writing and no element lower than 5.5</strong> to study this programme. If you need assistance with your English language, we offer a range of courses that can help prepare you for degree-level study.</p> <h2>Fees & funding</h2> <ul> <li>Home - full-time: £9250</li> <li>International - full-time: £17400</li> </ul> <p>If your fees are not listed here, please check our undergraduate fees guidance or contact the Fees Office, who can also advise you about how to pay your fees.</p> <p>It’s not currently possible for international students to study part-time if you require a Tier 4 student visa, however this is currently being reviewed and will be confirmed in the new year. Please read our visa guidance in the interim for more information. If you think you might be eligible to study part-time while being on another visa type, please contact our Admissions Team for more information.</p> <p>If you are looking to pay your fees please see our guide to making a payment.</p> <h3>Additional costs</h3> <p>In addition to your tuition fees, you'll be responsible for any additional costs associated with your course, such as buying stationery and paying for photocopying. You can find out more about what you need to budget for on our study costs page.</p> <p>There may also be specific additional costs associated with your programme. This can include things like paying for field trips or specialist materials for your assignments. Please check the programme specification for more information.</p> <h3>Funding opportunities</h3> <h2>Careers</h2> <ul> <li>critical and analytical skills</li> <li>ability to bring together insights from a range of subjects</li> <li>IT skills</li> </ul> <h3>Careers</h3> <p>Alumni from the Department have gone on to careers in television, radio, the press, publishing, film-making, advertising, marketing and public relations, web design, teaching and research, advertising, arts and administration, business and industry, European Union private sector management and personnel work, and many more both in the media industries and elsewhere. You can read more about possible career options after graduating on our Media and Communications careers page.</p> <h2>Student work</h2> <p>Here are some examples of our students' photographic and animation work. You can also read examples of their journalism on our news sites East London Lines and London Multimedia News. </p> Tue, 02/18/2020 - 14:55 1429787 1429787 BA (Hons) Fine Art https://research-jobs.net/program/ba-hons-fine-art-1425195 <h2>Course overview</h2> <p>This degree aims to equip you with creative, interpretive, critical and analytical skills, so that you can participate in and contribute to the expanding field of contemporary art.</p> <h3>Why study BA Fine Art at Goldsmiths?</h3> <ul> <li>You'll make and study contemporary art in a dynamic, critical and interdisciplinary environment</li> <li>We'll equip you with the skills that will help you develop independent thought and confidence in your practice, as well as transferable skills suitable for employment in the creative industries</li> <li>You'll have your own studio space from day one, and will have access to excellent facilities including specialist art practice areas</li> <li>All staff on the programme are practising artists, curators and writers, here to respond to the work that you make and to help you understand how it contributes to, and challenges, the critical debates that exist in the study area and beyond</li> <li>Since 1990, former Goldsmiths students have been nominated for the Turner Prize more than 30 times, and have won the prize on 8 occasions.</li> </ul> <p>Contact the department</p> <h2>What you'll study</h2> <p>Studio Practice (75% of the course)</p> <p>You’ll have your own studio space from day one with access to excellent facilities and technical advice. Studios are not divided by year or discipline, so you will be studying alongside students from all stages of the programme working in a wide variety of media, including:</p> <ul> <li>Drawing</li> <li>Performance</li> </ul> <p>Studio teaching is supported and complemented by workshop areas, which will introduce you to the techniques and skills relevant to the practical development of your work. </p> <p>You’ll have regular individual and group tutorials with your own tutor, with other tutors, and with visiting artists. You will also present your work for discussion with a larger group of students each term.</p> <p>Critical Studies (25% of the course)</p> <p>The lecture and seminar series in Year 1 offers a space for exploring and examining the historical and critical context in which art is made, seen and understood. The seminar options from which you can choose in Year 2 engage and extend your critical skills, enabling you to develop your ability to analyse, judge and write about contemporary art. Tutorials will guide your essay writing in Years 1 and 2, and will support the completion of your dissertation in Year 3.</p> <p>All staff on the programme are practising artists, curators and writers, here to respond to the work that you make and to help you understand how it contributes to and challenges the critical debates that exist in the study area and beyond. We support your development and creativity and help you acquire independent learning skills. This approach requires you to be committed, to thrive on constructive criticism exchanged between staff and students, and to participate in discussing your own work and that of others.</p> <h3>Teaching style</h3> <p>This programme is taught through intensive studio and research art practice, tutorials and mixed-year studio practice presentations. You'll also attend lectures and seminars where you'll hear about ideas and concepts related to specific topics, and where you'll be encouraged to discuss and debate the issues raised. </p> <p>You'll be allocated a studio space that will be the focal point of your activities. Students from all three levels share the studio spaces, providing valuable peer support. You will determine the nature of your practice and, with guidance from the tutorial staff, be encouraged to work in any medium that you choose.</p> <p>The following information gives an indication of the typical proportions of learning and teaching for each year of this programme*:</p> <ul> <li>Year 1 - 9% scheduled learning, 91% independent learning</li> <li>Year 2 - 9% scheduled learning, 91% independent learning</li> <li>Year 3 - 6% scheduled learning, 94% independent learning</li> </ul> <h3>How you’ll be assessed</h3> <p>Studio practice coursework is continuously assessed through individual tutorials and group seminars. This is complemented by studio presentations at Year 1, viva voce at Year 2, and a final exhibition at Year 3. Critical Studies is assessed through essays (Years 1 and 2) and a dissertation (Year 3).</p> <p>The following information gives an indication of how you can typically expect to be assessed on each year of this programme*:</p> <ul> <li>Year 1 - 93% coursework, 8% practical</li> <li>Year 2 - 85% coursework, 15% practical</li> <li>Year 3 - 100% coursework</li> </ul> <p>*Please note that these are averages are based on enrolments for 2017/18. Each student’s time in teaching, learning and assessment activities will differ based on individual module choices. Find out more about how this information is calculated.</p> <p> </p> <p>Download the programme specification. If you would like an earlier version of the programme specification, please contact the Quality Office.</p> <p>Please note that due to staff research commitments not all of these modules may be available every year.</p> <h2>What our students say</h2> <blockquote>Turner Prize-winning artist and film-maker who was the first black director to win a Best Picture Oscar for 12 Years a Slave.</blockquote> <p>Steve McQueen made his first films at Goldsmiths, graduating from the BA Fine Art course in 1993. In the same year he made Bear, which documented an ambiguous encounter between two naked men, one of whom is McQueen himself. The film raised issues about violence, homoeroticism and race, themes that continue to influence McQueen's work. In the years that followed he made more short films, often projecting them onto the walls of an enclosed gallery space, for heightened intimacy.</p> <p>In 1999 he won the Turner Prize for his original and uncompromising approach to film installation and his innovative presentation of work in other media. The organisers commented on McQueen’s ability to “take a simple incident or image and evoke complex emotions and ideas from them”.</p> <p>During his varied career he has also worked as an official war artist in Iraq (2006), and represented Britain at the Venice Biennale in 2009.</p> <p>In recent years McQueen has gained critical acclaim for filmmaking. In 2008 he won a BAFTA and the prestigious Caméra d’Or Award at the Cannes Film Festival for Hunger, his feature film about the 1981 Irish hunger strike. He co-wrote and directed Shame (2011), “a powerful plunge into the mania of addiction affliction”.</p> <p>His most celebrated film, 12 Years A Slave, is based on the 1853 autobiography of Solomon Northup and brings to life the incredible true story of a free man who was forced into slavery. The film – which has been described by The New Yorker as "easily the greatest film ever made about American slavery" – has won awards including an Oscar for Best Picture, the first film with a black director to scoop the award. It also earned a BAFTA for Best Film, and a Golden Globe for Best Motion Picture.</p> <h2>Entry requirements</h2> <p>Please note: It is not possible to transfer onto year two of this degree from another Higher Education provider. <strong>This programme also does not accept applications for deferred entry.</strong></p> <p>Our entry requirements for this programme are usually:</p> <ul> <li>Successful completion of three A-levels, International Baccalaureate or an equivalent qualification</li> <li>PLUS successful completion of an Art and Design Foundation diploma</li> <li>Portfolio of work</li> </ul> <p><strong>OR</strong></p> <p>Successful completion of a Foundation Diploma, BTEC Extended Diploma in Art and Design (completed by the end of the academic year preceding entry).Please note, students applying directly from A-Levels who have not completed an Art and Design Foundation or BTEC Extended Diploma in Art and Design will not be eligible for this programme.Mature students without formal qualifications who have relevant experience are also welcomed.</p> <h3>International qualifications</h3> <p>If English isn’t your first language, you will need an IELTS score (or equivalent English language qualification) of <strong>6.5 with a 6.5 in writing and no element lower than 6.0</strong> to study this programme. If you need assistance with your English language, we offer a range of courses that can help prepare you for degree-level study.</p> <h3>Selection process</h3> <p>After submitting your application you'll be asked to upload a portfolio online. If selected for interview, you'll be asked to bring along a portfolio of recent work and an essay. Find out more preparing your portfolio. </p> <h2>Fees & funding</h2> <ul> <li>Home - full-time: £9250</li> <li>International - full-time: £22950</li> </ul> <p>If your fees are not listed here, please check our undergraduate fees guidance or contact the Fees Office, who can also advise you about how to pay your fees.</p> <p>It’s not currently possible for international students to study part-time if you require a Tier 4 student visa, however this is currently being reviewed and will be confirmed in the new year. Please read our visa guidance in the interim for more information. If you think you might be eligible to study part-time while being on another visa type, please contact our Admissions Team for more information.</p> <p>If you are looking to pay your fees please see our guide to making a payment.</p> <h3>Additional costs</h3> <p>In addition to your tuition fees, you'll be responsible for any additional costs associated with your course, such as buying stationery and paying for photocopying. You can find out more about what you need to budget for on our study costs page.</p> <p>There may also be specific additional costs associated with your programme. This can include things like paying for field trips or specialist materials for your assignments. Please check the programme specification for more information.</p> <h3>Funding opportunities</h3> <h2>Facilities</h2> <h3>Facilities</h3> <p>Our spectacular Ben Pimlott Building provides purpose-built teaching space on campus, including some of the art studios, lecture theatres, and digital media practice areas. The studios benefit from generous floor-to-ceiling windows. The department provides space for:</p> <ul> <li>art studios</li> </ul> <ul> <li>3D printing</li> <li>Stitch and fabric</li> </ul> <h3>Studios</h3> <p>All students have their own studio space. This is a place in which to work, to meet and spend time with other students, and to have tutorials. It's also a base from which to organise your work in other parts of the college – such as the various art practice areas, the workshops, and the library – as well as your research visits to galleries and exhibitions in London.</p> <p>The studios are occupied by students from all three years of the course. This arrangement maximises opportunities for conversation and exchange, and helps to encourage sharing of knowledge, interest and experience between students.</p> <h2>Student work</h2> <h3>Skills</h3> <p>All our undergraduate programmes will give you the skills to develop independent thought and confidence in your practice. These skills will also be of use in other career paths you may wish to follow. You'll develop the following transferable skills:</p> <ul> <li>critical and analytical skills</li> <li>IT skills</li> </ul> <p>We provide you with a series of opportunities for specialist advice and further information to complement your studies and prepare you for professional life after graduation. Our students actively seek opportunities to exhibit their work beyond Goldsmiths through external networks while they are here. </p> <h3>Careers</h3> <p>Many graduates have continued to be successful, practising artists long after graduating, winning major prizes and exhibiting around the world. The Turner Prize shortlist has consistently included at least one of our former undergraduates. Seven of the prize-winners have studied here: Grenville Davey, Antony Gormley, Damien Hirst, Gillian Wearing, Steve McQueen, Mark Wallinger and Laure Prouvost.</p> <p>The interdisciplinary nature of the programme will enable you to work in a variety of fields (eg media, museums, education, the music business, and academia) and progress to a variety of careers, including:</p> <ul> <li>practising artist</li> <li>designer</li> </ul> Tue, 02/18/2020 - 14:54 1425195 1425195 Bachelor's Degree in Engineering Grenoble INP - Phelma, Bachelor in Nuclear Engineering https://research-jobs.net/program/bachelors-degree-in-engineering-grenoble-inp-phelma-bachelor-in-nuclear-engineering-1430769 <p>Summary</p> <p>The international Bachelor in Nuclear Engineering is a one year program designed for two types of students: those who have finished a three year Bachelor’s degree and want to acquire a specialization in nuclear engineering or those pursuing a four year degree and want to do their last year in a highly specialized environment dedicated to nuclear engineering. In either case, upon completion of the program, students will be granted a diploma from the Grenoble INP - Phelma Engineering school. The program is based on series of interdisciplinary and nuclear specific courses divided in three modules -nuclear sciences (interaction of radiation with matter, nuclear reactors, nuclear instrumentation etc.) engineering sciences (mathematics, thermodynamics, heat transfer etc.) and languages/sports and it prepares students to be able to perform competently in occupational areas such as reactor operations, health physics, quality assurance, instrumentation and control technology, as well as in related areas in the nuclear technology field. </p> <h3>Objectives</h3> <p>Obtaining a diploma in Bachelor of Nuclear Engineering may be a first step towards a promising future career. The students will qualify (often after completing a Master of Science in Nuclear Engineering and, if need be, after obtaining a PhD degree) for an interesting, multidisciplinary profession with excellent job opportunities in industry, research and national authorities. Tasks that are on the agenda - like the safe and reliable operation of existing and new reactors, the development of novel reactor types, the sustainable supply of nuclear fuel, the closure of the fuel cycle, the disposal of radioactive waste without harm to the environment, and many others - represent scientific and technical challenges for motivated young engineers and researchers.</p> <h3>Specificities</h3> <p> </p> <ul> <li>Courses are strongly oriented to problem solving and team work</li> <li>All professors are active researchers at the LPSC or other laboratories</li> <li>Students will have a high-level qualification, which enables them to enroll and successfully continue their studies in the Master programs</li> </ul> <p> </p> <ul> <li> <h3>Training partners</h3> <h2>Laboratories</h2> <p>There are many opportunities to perform research internships thanks to a very high density of academic laboratories in the Grenoble area, such as LPSC, SIMAP, LEPMI and others. Professors involved in the bachelor program are themselves active researchers and help students to find stimulating research projects. As an example, the group of nuclear structure at the LPSC laboratory is working on experimental and theoretical nuclear structure problems, the group of nuclear reactors of the same laboratory has an expertise in molten salt reactors, nuclear data, thorium, and accelerator driven systems. The SIMAP laboratory is involved in multiscale modelling of irradiation defects in materials and studies behavior of materials for fission reactors and ITER. The LEPMI laboratory focuses on problems related to fluid dynamics, corrosion...</p> </li> </ul> <p>A+Augmenter la taille du texteA-Réduire la taille du texteImprimer le documentEnvoyer cette page par mailPartagez cet articleFacebookTwitterLinked In</p> <h2>Admission</h2> <ul> <li>Location :GRENOBLE</li> </ul> <h3>Entry requirements</h3> <p>The international Bachelor in Nuclear Engineering is a one year program designed for two types of students:</p> <ul> <li>those who have finished a three year Bachelor’s degree and want to acquire a specialization in nuclear engineering</li> <li>or those pursuing a four year degree and want to do their last year in a highly specialized environment dedicated to nuclear engineering.</li> </ul> <p> </p> <h3>Apply now</h3> <p> Visit the Admissions section of the school’s website (in French).</p> <h3>Contacts</h3> <h2>Program</h2> <ul> <li>Internships abroad :An internship in France or another country is required.</li> </ul> <h3>Program</h3> <h3>Board of examiners</h3> <p>Each semester is worth 30 ECTS credits, spread out over the different courses completed. Students must obtain a grade of at least 10/20 in each course to obtain the credits.</p> <p>A+Augmenter la taille du texteA-Réduire la taille du texteImprimer le documentEnvoyer cette page par mailPartagez cet articleFacebookTwitterLinked In</p> <h2>International</h2> <h3>International exchange</h3> <p>Students in this major benefit from many agreements between Grenoble Institute of Technology and partners around the globe in the form of exchange programs, dual-degree programs, internships, and more.</p> <h2>Information on available scolarships</h2> <p>Are you a foreign student with a Master level qualification wanting to study at one of the six engineering Schools of the Grenoble Institute of Technology? You can find all the funding schemes available for you course in Grenoble on our website at Grenoble INP.A+Augmenter la taille du texteA-Réduire la taille du texteImprimer le documentEnvoyer cette page par mailPartagez cet articleFacebookTwitterLinked In</p> <h2>Prospects</h2> <h3>Expected learning outcomes</h3> <p>Students will be able to perform competently in occupational areas such as reactor operations, health physics, quality assurance, instrumentation and control technology, as well as in related areas in the nuclear technology field.</p> <h3>Careers</h3> <p>Job opportunities in industry, research and national authorities. Tasks that are on the agenda - like the safe and reliable operation of existing and new reactors, the development of novel reactor types, the sustainable supply of nuclear fuel, the closure of the fuel cycle, the disposal of radioactive waste without harm to the environment, and many others - represent scientific and technical challenges for motivated young engineers and researchers.</p> <h3>Further learning opportunities</h3> <p>With the Bachelor degree, it is possible to undertake a master degree everywhere in the world. At Grenoble INP-Phelma, registration to MaNuEn (Materials science for Nuclear Energy) master is possible.</p> <p>A+Augmenter la taille du texteA-Réduire la taille du texteImprimer le documentEnvoyer cette page par mailPartagez cet articleFacebookTwitterLinked In</p> <p> </p> Tue, 02/18/2020 - 14:41 1430769 1430769 BA (Hons) Fashion Marketing (Buying) with Integrated Foundation https://research-jobs.net/program/ba-hons-fashion-marketing-buying-with-integrated-foundation-1429531 <p> </p> <p>The BA (Hons) Fashion Marketing (Buying) with Integrated Foundation is designed for those who do not meet the requirements for direct entry to the BA (Hons) Fashion Marketing (Buying). It includes one year of studies at the foundation level and then a further three years at BA level.</p> <p>Successful completion of the foundation year guarantees progression to your selected degree programme.</p> <p>The BA level Fashion Marketing (Buying) programme  will enable you to enhance your knowledge and specialise in fashion buying. The core modules that you undertake will also reflect your learning toward this particular pathway, such as fashion vocabulary and fashion buying and merchandising.</p> <p>You will study in the heart of London, world-renowned as a fashion capital. Our campus is close to a range of companies, retail hubs, museums and galleries, which you will visit as part of the programme.</p> <p>You will study both historic and contemporary issues in fashion. You will explore existing international brands and look at how they use creativity in many forms. The programme will develop your communication skills and help you to devise compelling stories about products and brands.</p> <p>You will work on practical projects including:</p> <ul> <li>Fashion shows</li> <li>Photoshoots</li> </ul> <p>You will also look at innovative marketing techniques including the use of influencers and celebrities, social media marketing, collaborations, pop-up stores and brand extensions.</p> <p>You will learn to forecast trends, take data and use it to independently make creative, strategic marketing decisions. You will have access to a range of industry resources, including Fashion Monitor, the industry's main platform for influencer marketing and PR solutions.</p> <p>You will have the opportunity to undertake practical projects and work with students on other fashion design programmes to produce fashion shows, events and photo shoots.</p> <h2>Length</h2> <p>This is a full time four year programme, comprising of one year of foundation studies followed by three years of study at degree level.</p> <h2>Foundation year modules (Term 1)</h2> <p>Module Title</p> <table> <thead> <tr> </tr> </thead> <tbody> <tr> <td>This module will enable you to apply and improve your technical ability in a range of media, traditional and digital, as you bring your creative ideas into realisation. You will also learn how to present your art and design work effectively.</td> </tr> </tbody> </table> <h2>Foundation year modules (Term 2)</h2> <p>In the second term, you will choose three out of the five modules listed below, designed to introduce specialist areas of study:</p> <p>Module Title</p> <table> <thead> <tr> </tr> </thead> <tbody> <tr> <td>The module gives you first-hand experience of the exciting and constantly evolving area of design. You will develop your understanding of the scale and breadth of contemporary forms and practices within the broader design environment. This module will prepare you to develop and apply design skills within an industry context.</td> </tr> <tr> <td>This module offers a broad introduction to the fashion design process. You will gather research and design and construct items in response. These items will be documented through photography and styling exercises. The module introduces the use of basic manufacturing processes and construction techniques, together with the study skills that are integral to the design process. You will make or deconstruct several basic items that you have designed in response to a given brief.</td> </tr> <tr> <td>This module introduces the fashion industry and the different contexts in which it operates. You will learn about the structure of the industry, the way fashion works and how to stay ahead in this fast-paced industry. You will explore the fashion marketing environment and be introduced to fundamental marketing research skills, tools and methodologies. You will experience creating fashion images, a fashion shoot, and will be involved, where possible, in fashion show and events. By starting to research contemporary fashion companies, you will learn about fashion products, consumers and the marketplace. You will debate current fashion business and marketing issues and learn to present your ideas, working both as part of a team and individually. The module culminates in a collaborative project.</td> </tr> <tr> <td>This module explores the fundamental principles, methods and media used by graphic designers. To this end you will be introduced to the design process, design research and creative thinking methods, and you will use key tools and techniques currently used in graphic and digital design. The module also aims to enable you to start to understand the role of the audience or user experience, and the contexts within which graphic designers work. You will develop your ability to use graphic and digital design (photography, typography, illustration) through creating exciting design solutions to one individual and one collaborative graphic design brief.</td> </tr> <tr> <td>This module prepares you for your undergraduate degree path by providing you with knowledge, understanding and technical skills in the area of interior design. You will gain a broad understanding of spatial principles and concepts for interior environments, and explore how human needs (cultural, social, political and economic) may be met through spatial solutions. You will learn about the design process and start to develop your own skills, tools and work methodologies. You will also explore the design of space through photography, film, drawing and graphics, and test your ideas through material research, model making, installations and spatial interventions.</td> </tr> </tbody> </table> <h2>BA (Hons) Fashion Marketing (Buying) - Year 1 (Core modules)</h2> <p>Module Title</p> <table> <thead> <tr> </tr> </thead> <tbody> <tr> <td>In this module you will acquire knowledge of the role of marketing within the fashion industry. You will develop your knowledge of fashion and the fashion business, and your ability to stay in touch with developments at the forefront of this fast-moving industry. You will learn about key fashion marketing theories, tools and methodologies and you will apply these to projects about the contemporary fashion market. You will comprehensively explore the range of marketing activities that fashion companies engage in. You will complete projects where you will apply theory to practice in assignments that include developing a promotional campaign and associated visual, virtual and text-based work.</td> </tr> <tr> <td>In this module, you will explore how images are used as a means of communication in fashion. You will explore the roles of graphics and typography, styling and photography in communicating about fashion. You will study how the fashion industry promotes its products and creates brand awareness through, for instance; the web, advertising, advertorial and packaging. You will explore the use of new technologies in relation to visual imagery.</td> </tr> <tr> <td>This is a University-wide common module, which facilitates interpersonal, intercultural and trans-disciplinary learning for all Year 1 students enrolled on Regent’s degree programmes. The module introduces a range of ideas and ways of thinking based around the University’s values, reflected in its learning outcomes. It encourages you to interact with the broader University community, both socially and academically, to cross the physical and intellectual borders of your degree programmes. Global Perspectives aims to increase self-awareness and prepares you for your subsequent studies by familiarising you with the resources available to meet your lifelong learning needs.</td> </tr> <tr> <td>In this module you will study consumer behaviour, analysing its relationship to how consumers purchase fashion products and brands. You will focus on research into consumer attributes and the trends that inspire and influence the purchase of fashion products. You will develop an understanding of how cultural, social, personal and psychological characteristics of consumers affect their buyer behaviour. You will develop an understanding about how consumer attributes including demographics, social class, lifecycle, reference groups, lifestyles, values and attributes affect the development and marketing of international fashion products and brands. You will learn how market researchers effectively communicate their findings to others, through statistical, biographical and visual formats.</td> </tr> <tr> <td>You will be introduced to fundamental developments in European fashion from the 18th Century to contemporary times. Social, political, technological as well as wider art/design history will be covered to place fashion in a context. Both historical knowledge and contextual understanding enhance your understanding and/or practice of contemporary fashion.</td> </tr> <tr> <td>In this module you will develop your knowledge on how technology has shaped the principles of fashion marketing. You will gain an understanding of the development of technology, digital marketing and social media. You will learn the core digital marketing and social media trends, frameworks, analytical tools and how to apply it within a marketing strategy. You will explore digital marketing and social media activities consisting of; branding, storytelling, search engine optimisation, content creation, analytics and metrics, blogging, CRM, online consumer behaviour and future trends.</td> </tr> <tr> <td>This module aims to increase your awareness and confidence in knowledge of the language of fashion, through colour, cut, silhouette and fabrics. It begins the process of developing your vocabulary with key descriptive terms and ways to appropriately use these terms in specific contexts. Crucially, the ability to understand that different audiences understand different levels of terminology is a key aspect of the activities you undertake in this module. Being able to define and describe through terminology is a highly desirable attribute in fashion communication. This module is not just about terms and definitions, however. We will also explore specific designers with defining methods and styles, brands with particular looks and approaches, in order for you to evaluate and demonstrate your skills in context.</td> </tr> </tbody> </table> <h2>BA (Hons) Fashion Marketing (Buying) - Year 1 (Elective modules)</h2> <p>In addition you will need to choose one elective module from the list below.</p> <p>Module Title</p> <table> <thead> <tr> </tr> </thead> <tbody> <tr> <td>In this module, you will be introduced to the structure and workings of the fashion industry, focusing on marketing and communications in particular. You will learn how different organisations work together to ensure a seamless and effective transition from concept to collection to customer. You will become familiar with the roles and responsibilities of individuals and teams within these organisations in order to more fully understand how fashion is effectively communicated and marketed. You will be expected to undertake your own fact-finding and research to discover which areas of this vast and dynamic industry appeals to you.</td> </tr> <tr> <td>In an increasingly interconnected world, knowledge of a foreign language can facilitate transactions and provide skills which are crucial for success in a multicultural environment. Cultural sensitivity and intelligence will enable you to have more rewarding social interaction with people who have a different identity from your own and increase your global career prospects.</td> </tr> </tbody> </table> <h2>BA (Hons) Fashion Marketing (Buying) - Year 2 (Core modules)</h2> <p>Module Title</p> <table> <thead> <tr> </tr> </thead> <tbody> <tr> <td>This module gives you the opportunity to study the planning and strategy development process in relation to fashion marketing, promotion and communication. The module takes you from initial concept, research and analysis, through concept development to the creation of an integrated marketing and communications plan. You will learn about the theories and activities involved in marketing management and you will develop both your critical research and analysis skills, and your ability to engage in creative development.</td> </tr> <tr> <td>In this module you will study how trends arise by considering market and consumer intelligence as well as aesthetic, economic, social and cultural influences. You will explore how emerging trends are used to inspire and influence in relation to the fashion industry. You will conduct research and work on trend predictions. You will learn to assess markets, identify emerging trends and create directional trend materials. These materials will then act as inspiration for you to conduct your own styled fashion shoot that is reflective of these trends in practice.</td> </tr> <tr> <td>In this module you will explore contemporary fashion brands and examine the strategies that are used to create a unique personality, generate appeal and develop a 'desirability factor' for potential consumers. You will explore how brands are built from conception and development through to brand promotion and management. You will examine how brand identity is used as a strategic tool to promote products and build loyalty in consumers. The module will cover the development of values and ethics required to develop successful brands. You will also explore the implications of changing environments for fashion consumers and fashion brands. You will examine case studies of successful international brands.</td> </tr> <tr> <td>In this module you will examine how the product development, buying and merchandising processes work within the contemporary fashion business and fashion marketing. You will learn about the fashion product, product development, clothing manufacture, and supply chain management. You will learn buying and merchandising theory. You will explore merchandise planning, strategies, costing, sourcing and supply. You will draw upon learning in earlier modules and integrate your knowledge of the fashion consumer, marketing research and fashion trends to research for and create a detailed range plan.</td> </tr> </tbody> </table> <h2>BA (Hons) Fashion Marketing (Buying) - Year 2 (Elective modules)</h2> <p>In addition you will need to choose one or two elective modules from the list below.</p> <p>Module Title</p> <table> <thead> <tr> </tr> </thead> <tbody> <tr> <td>This module introduces you to the history, theory and practice of fashion show production and about how to plan and manage a fashion event. You will be introduced to the different roles and responsibilities involved in creating a successful fashion show or fashion event. You will develop an understanding of the tradition of catwalk shows and events exploring the role of shows and events within contemporary fashion and you will examine the social, ethical and environmental issues relating to these promotional activities. You will learn the practice of fashion show production and event management through tutor-led presentations and guest talks and by working in teams to plan a professional event.</td> </tr> <tr> <td>In this module you will learn how the fashion media and public relations (PR) operate in the fast-moving world of fashion. You will explore the world of fashion publishing, the role that the media plays in communicating fashion, and the interrelationship between two of the most important sectors in the industry. You will learn to analyse and identify audiences, how to create personality through media platforms and how to communicate and manage image through PR activities.</td> </tr> <tr> <td>This module is designed specifically for those students who are interested in engaging in their own entrepreneurial enterprise in fashion upon graduation. It will help you define both the spirit and practicalities of entrepreneurship, and offers the opportunity to implement what is learned in this module in greater detail in the Major Project modules in your final year. It will equip you with the information required for you to consider starting your own unique enterprise, either individually or collaboratively.</td> </tr> <tr> <td>This module will give you the opportunity to experience what it is like to work in your chosen industry, while developing your employability and increasing your graduate career prospects. It will provide you with a deeper understanding of your subject and allow you to acquire greater knowledge of the industry. It will enable you to explore and experience its practices, develop your intellectual and practical knowledge and skills directly in relation to the industry, apply some of what you have learned on your programme and reflect upon your career aspirations.</td> </tr> <tr> <td>This module enables you to develop an understanding of photography in different areas of fashion such as; advertising, film, catwalk, and editorial. You will learn about roles and responsibilities of a fashion photographer. You will study photography as a visual language of contemporary fashion.</td> </tr> <tr> <td>The aim of this module is to deepen your technical and creative skills, with focus on experimenting with and exploring technologies, both current and emerging, still and moving, to allow you to visualise and communicate new perspectives on the fashion image, and allow you to develop confidence and originality in visual communication. One aim therefore is to re-inforce existing knowledge and skill relevant to the fashion image, and another to extend and broaden the application of these skills with imagination and originality. To achieve the aim of originality and innovation, the research and development aspect of this module is emphasised as you are encouraged to experiment and imagine, towards creative exciting outcomes.</td> </tr> <tr> <td>Regent’s Connect is a portfolio of language, cultural and cross-cultural elective modules available to the student community at Regent’s University London. Connect Modules are designed to broaden your education, enhance your CV and give you those extra attributes employers are often looking for. You will gain valuable life skills such as the ability to communicate across cultural and linguistic boundaries, you will develop resilience and self-awareness. In an increasingly interconnected world, knowledge of a foreign language can facilitate transactions and provide skills which are crucial for success in a multicultural environment. Cultural sensitivity and intelligence will enable you to have more rewarding social interaction with people who have a different identity from your own and increase your global career prospects.</td> </tr> </tbody> </table> <h2>BA (Hons) Fashion Marketing (Buying) - Year 3</h2> <p>Module Title</p> <table> <thead> <tr> </tr> </thead> <tbody> <tr> <td>This module will expose you to innovative and visionary contemporary marketing communications campaigns, used to generate awareness and sales of brands, products or services, in fashion and other sectors. You will consolidate your understanding of fashion marketing and integrated marketing communications strategies by examining how companies have successfully created and used such strategies.</td> </tr> <tr> <td>In this module you will have the opportunity to undertake a sustained period of self-directed research, and to employ all of your learning on the programme, in exploring an area of interest to you, related to fashion. It may also be related to your career aspirations. The outcome of the module will be through a dissertation format – including both secondary and primary research activities.</td> </tr> <tr> <td>You will work on the second part of your sustained period of self-directed study. This module follows on from Major Project- Research & Development. You will draw upon your research and analysis as well as your creative development work from elsewhere during the course, and work on the realisation of your project, culminating in the creation of a project based on integrated fashion marketing communications. The focus will be based on an area of interest to you, related to fashion and may relate to your career aspirations. The project will be soundly justified in the context of the future fashion marketplace, it will be directional, and it will embody your individual approach to, and philosophy about, fashion as the culmination of your work on the fashion marketing programme.</td> </tr> <tr> <td>This module will help you to consider your future, plan and prepare to achieve your goals. You will analyse your skills, your strengths and your interests. You will engage in and present comprehensive research into the careers market in relation to your chosen field. You will learn how to create a strong portfolio of work based on projects completed during your degree and new project work completed during the module. You will learn how to produce professional curriculum vitae and how to prepare for job applications and interviews. You will explore the importance of networking and you will build confidence in preparation for launching yourself into the fashion industry.</td> </tr> </tbody> </table> <h3>How to apply</h3> <p>Applying to study at Regent's University London is quick and easy. We have put together some helpful information to guide you through the process. We accept direct applications and there is no application fee.</p> <p><strong>Not received your results yet?</strong></p> <p>That's fine, you can still apply even without your exam results. We can issue a conditional offer without your results. You just need be clear in your application which qualifications you are currently studying for.</p> <h2><strong>Application deadlines</strong></h2> <p>If you have not uploaded the relevant supporting documents during the online application process, you should ensure that we have the below supporting documents as soon as you have completed your application. These can be sent to the Regent’s Admissions Department via email to [email protected].</p> <ul> <li>Copies of academic transcripts and certificates from all previous studies (i.e. secondary school and/or university certificates)</li> <li>One academic letter of recommendation</li> <li>A 300-500 word personal statement outlining the reasons for applying to your chosen programme, how you feel you will benefit from the programme of study, what contributions you will make to the University and how this will help your future career aspirations.</li> <li>A copy of your passport photograph (ID) page</li> <li>If you are not a native English speaker, proof of your English proficiency</li> </ul> <p><strong>Credit Transfer</strong></p> <ul> <li>If you’ve already studied part of a degree course elsewhere, you may be able apply for Recognition of Prior Learning (RPL) and join the programme at an advanced entry point. If you’d like to request entry part-way through a programme, make sure you state this clearly in your statement of purpose and provide us with the transcripts and module descriptions for the relevant study.</li> </ul> <h3>Step 2 Receive a response to your application</h3> <p>You can expect to receive a decision on your application within 10 working days of receipt of your completed application and supporting documents.</p> <p>We will assess whether you meet our entry requirements and will notify you of the decision via email. UCAS applicants will also receive official notification via the UCAS system.</p> <p>For some of our programmes, the selection process may include an interview or audition. Interviews/auditions can take the form of a one-to-one interview, group interview or portfolio review which may be conducted by telephone or as a Skype call. Arrangements of these are made between the Admissions Department and the applicant.</p> <h3>Step 3 Accepting your offer</h3> <p>If you wish to accept the offer you must pay the advance tuition fee deposit (non-refundable) to confirm your place.</p> <h3>Step 4 After you have accepted your place</h3> <p>Closer to the start of the term, the Admissions Team will send information regarding the registration process. This will include information on completing your online enrolment prior to your arrival as well as a checklist of documents you will need to bring with you to fully register onto the programme.</p> <h3>Information for international students</h3> <p>If you are an overseas student requiring visa sponsorship to study in the UK, our team will be in touch with information on applying for your student visa and the documents you will need. More information can be found on our visas and immigration page.</p> <h2>Scholarships and funding</h2> <p>Funding for UK, and EU nationals, as well as students with the status of Migrant Worker.</p> <h3>Annual programme degree level fee (September 2020 - May 2021)</h3> <p>£18,000</p> <h3>What do fees include?</h3> <p>Fees cover the cost of all tuition and access to the University’s IT infrastructure and library learning resources. Fees are presented for the first level of study which equates to two terms.</p> <h3>What other costs should I budget for?</h3> <p>You will need to budget additional funds for accommodation and living expenses, travel, and any additional trips, visits, activities or courses (such as Summer programmes) that you choose to participate in outside of the tuition offered as part of the programme. You will also need to budget for materials that you will use for garment construction during the programme.</p> <p>The library hold a limited number of copies of core text books and where possible in e-format. You will be encouraged to purchase your own text books and will need to budget approximately £80-£100 per year, depending on your programme of study.</p> <h3>When are fees paid?</h3> <ul> <li>An initial non-refundable advance deposit paid when you accept your offer of a place</li> <li>The advance deposit is allocated against the first term’s fees</li> <li>Tuition fees (including fees for subsequent terms) are due two weeks in advance of classes commencing</li> </ul> <h3>Calculating annual fee increases</h3> <ul> <li>The University sets tuition fees on an annual basis in line with the University's financial year which runs from 1 August to 31 July</li> <li>The fees quoted here are for one academic year of study</li> <li>Fees for the foundation level year are lower than fees for the subsequent BA programme. As you progress to the full BA programme after the foundation year, your fees will increase (see above for the September 2019 entry fee to give a guide price)</li> <li>Fees for subsequent years of study are subject to fee inflation</li> <li>The University aims to keep annual fee increases in line with the University’s cost inflation. The expectation is that this will be no greater than UK consumer price inflation (CPI) plus 3%. There are occasionally variations to this dictated by the costs of running specific programmes or facilities required for our programmes</li> <li>As a registered charity, all fee increases are subject to approval of the Trustee Board thus ensuring that affordability for our students remains a primary concern in any decisions regarding fee increases</li> </ul> <p>This is a varied programme, taught through a mixture of:</p> <ul> <li>Lectures</li> </ul> <h3>Contact hours and expected workload</h3> <p>Typical overall contact hours for a 20 Credit module is 60 hours per term (approximately 5 hours per week). 60 Credits are taken per term. Weekly contact may vary from module to module. Most modules comprise of multiple components, often assessed throughout the term, including essays, reports, creative realization and both individual and group based activities and presentations.</p> <h3>Teaching staff</h3> <p>The programme benefits from staff with a wide range of experience in industry, including marketing, PR, creative direction, styling, journalism, trends, buying, merchandising, fashion and marketing research and theory and computer aided design for fashion. </p> <p>The core team is comprised of experienced academics alongside a number of visiting lecturers from industry.</p> <h3>Methods of assessment</h3> <ul> <li>Essays</li> </ul> <h3>Disability Support</h3> <p>We welcome and support students with a wide range of disabilities and health concerns. This includes learning difficulties, visual and hearing impairments, mental health difficulties, autism spectrum conditions, mobility difficulties, and temporary or chronic health conditions.</p> <p>Our dedicated Disability Officer is here to support you. We ask that you speak with Student Registry and our Disability Officer as early as you can to enable us to support you. Find out more about our disability support and contact us.</p> <h3>Academic requirements</h3> <p>A Regent’s education provides you with a high level of personal attention, and this begins from the moment you apply to study with us. We want to understand who you are and what your skills and interests may be – we are interested in your potential, as well as your prior achievements. We review each application comprehensively and on its individual merit, considering all of your skills, interests and attributes.</p> <p>Typically, we will make an offer to a student holding at least 5 GCSEs at grades A-C / 9-4 or international equivalent including Mathematics. Regent’s receives applications from over 170 countries and assesses all international qualifications, for example, we would make an offer of minimum 2.5 GPA for the American High School Diploma.</p> <h3>English requirements</h3> <ul> <li>IELTS: Overall score of 5.5, with a minimum of 5.5 in each individual component</li> <li>GCSE/IGCSE English, grade C / 4 (for IGCSE certificates, please provide the Supplementary Certifying Statement with the breakdown of component grades)</li> </ul> <p>This list is not exhaustive, we will review the English qualifications you have as part of your application and be in contact if we require anything further.</p> <p>For applicants who wish to improve their English language proficiency, please see our English language courses.</p> <h3>Regent's English Password Test (REPT)</h3> <p>For offer holders able to visit us in London, we can provide an on-campus English diagnostic test known as the Regent’s English Password Test (REPT). This test must be arranged in advance. To find out more information and to book a test, please visit the REPT page. Please note, the REPT test will be free of charge until 31 May 2020. From 1 June 2020, there will be a £50 charge to take the REPT test.</p> <p> </p> Tue, 02/18/2020 - 14:38 1429531 1429531 BA (Hons) Interior Design with Integrated Foundation https://research-jobs.net/program/ba-hons-interior-design-with-integrated-foundation-1430802 <p> </p> <p>The BA (Hons) Interior Design with Integrated Foundation is designed for those who do not meet the requirements for direct entry to the BA (Hons) Interior Design. It includes one year of studies at the foundation level and then a further three years at BA level.</p> <p>Successful completion of the foundation year guarantees progression to your selected degree programme.</p> <p>The BA level Interior Design programme at Regent's allows you to gain a deep understanding of built spaces and to design for people and their needs. You'll learn to exercise your creativity and design spaces that improve the lives of the people who use them.</p> <p>The programme covers a range of public and private spaces, considering them from a variety of angles, including:</p> <ul> <li>Historical</li> <li>Architectural</li> </ul> <p>The programme will introduce you to interior design principles, practices, styles and professional standards. You will explore the importance of location and context, and learn how to create spaces that meet the requirements of its users.</p> <p>You will then learn how to apply these to a brief, choosing the best materials, tools and techniques. This includes the skills you need to effectively communicate with employers and clients.</p> <p>The programme is industry-focussed. This means that you will be taught by expert practitioners and spend time working on real-world briefs and live competitions. You'll visit the studios of practicing designers and have the chance to attend industry-insight lectures.</p> <p>You'll also be taught the drawing and making skills you'll need to succeed in industry. You'll use our dedicated studio space, which includes:</p> <ul> <li>3D printer</li> </ul> <h2>Length</h2> <p>This is a full time four year programme, comprising of one year of foundation studies followed by three years of study at degree level.</p> <h2>Foundation year modules (Term 1)</h2> <p>Module Title</p> <table> <thead> <tr> </tr> </thead> <tbody> <tr> <td>This module will enable you to apply and improve your technical ability in a range of media, traditional and digital, as you bring your creative ideas into realisation. You will also learn how to present your art and design work effectively.</td> </tr> </tbody> </table> <h2>Foundation year modules (Term 2)</h2> <p>In the second term, you will choose three out of the five modules listed below, designed to introduce specialist areas of study:</p> <p>Module Title</p> <table> <thead> <tr> </tr> </thead> <tbody> <tr> <td>The module gives you first-hand experience of the exciting and constantly evolving area of design. You will develop your understanding of the scale and breadth of contemporary forms and practices within the broader design environment. This module will prepare you to develop and apply design skills within an industry context.</td> </tr> <tr> <td>This module offers a broad introduction to the fashion design process. You will gather research and design and construct items in response. These items will be documented through photography and styling exercises. The module introduces the use of basic manufacturing processes and construction techniques, together with the study skills that are integral to the design process. You will make or deconstruct several basic items that you have designed in response to a given brief.</td> </tr> <tr> <td>This module introduces the fashion industry and the different contexts in which it operates. You will learn about the structure of the industry, the way fashion works and how to stay ahead in this fast-paced industry. You will explore the fashion marketing environment and be introduced to fundamental marketing research skills, tools and methodologies. You will experience creating fashion images, a fashion shoot, and will be involved, where possible, in fashion show and events. By starting to research contemporary fashion companies, you will learn about fashion products, consumers and the marketplace. You will debate current fashion business and marketing issues and learn to present your ideas, working both as part of a team and individually. The module culminates in a collaborative project.</td> </tr> <tr> <td>This module explores the fundamental principles, methods and media used by graphic designers. To this end you will be introduced to the design process, design research and creative thinking methods, and you will use key tools and techniques currently used in graphic and digital design. The module also aims to enable you to start to understand the role of the audience or user experience, and the contexts within which graphic designers work. You will develop your ability to use graphic and digital design (photography, typography, illustration) through creating exciting design solutions to one individual and one collaborative graphic design brief.</td> </tr> <tr> <td>This module prepares you for your undergraduate degree path by providing you with knowledge, understanding and technical skills in the area of interior design. You will gain a broad understanding of spatial principles and concepts for interior environments, and explore how human needs (cultural, social, political and economic) may be met through spatial solutions. You will learn about the design process and start to develop your own skills, tools and work methodologies. You will also explore the design of space through photography, film, drawing and graphics, and test your ideas through material research, model making, installations and spatial interventions.</td> </tr> </tbody> </table> <h2>BA (Hons) Interior Design - Year 1 (Core modules)</h2> <p>Module Title</p> <table> <thead> <tr> </tr> </thead> <tbody> <tr> <td>This module begins a series of studio projects throughout the year that develop your abilities in the interior design process from generating ideas through to detailed resolution. You will experience the fundamental processes of design through understanding existing contexts and devising appropriate narrative and spatial proposals.</td> </tr> <tr> <td>Through a series of lectures, workshops, seminars and visits, you are introduced to chronological histories of the interior and architecture based on a thematic range of design principles that have resulted in its evolution across time and place. The module engages your abilities to look closely at the world around you, so as to develop a rich design vocabulary from both the past and the present: and to recognise different perspectives on, and experiences of built space. This will be done by developing looking and writing skills, to build up observation and investigation skills, central to both history and theory and to the design studio.</td> </tr> <tr> <td>In this module, you will start by learning a range of traditional hand drawn orthographic techniques used in interior design – plans, sections, elevations, perspectives, axonometrics and isometrics – followed by an introduction to basic software packages, such as Photoshop and 2D CAD. These are some basic techniques of representation that will enable you to effectively communicate your interior design proposals throughout the programme, supported by the analytical mapping, modelling and visualisation techniques you are learning in the design studio. Through the study and practice of different ways of drawing, measuring and representing the characteristics of space, structure and form, you will also become familiar with design terminologies and with how to communicate to different audiences, by being both accurate and evocative.</td> </tr> <tr> <td>This is a University-wide common module, which facilitates interpersonal, intercultural and trans-disciplinary learning for all Year 1 students enrolled on Regent’s degree programmes. The module introduces a range of ideas and ways of thinking based around the University’s values, reflected in its learning outcomes. It encourages you to interact with the broader University community, both socially and academically, to cross the physical and intellectual borders of your degree programmes. Global Perspectives aims to increase self-awareness and prepares you for your subsequent studies by familiarising you with the resources available to meet your lifelong learning needs.</td> </tr> <tr> <td>This module introduces a dynamic process of investigation and analysis in design thinking and solving practical problems, whilst building on skills and consolidating techniques developed in the first term. Projects in this module will explore more complex public sites and programmes and, where appropriate, will engage with real clients in form of live projects. The projects will be located within an existing site, introducing you to survey techniques and asking you to design a scheme in response to a specific context. You will be encouraged to develop and test a design process through multiple iterations, working from initial site analysis, concept and programme development towards the complexity and detail required to inform a final proposal. The first project ‘Designing for People’ introduces you to the knowledge and skills required to understand how the interior spaces we design affect and enhance the experience of the occupation.</td> </tr> <tr> <td>Through a series of lectures, workshops, seminars and visits, you will develop a deep understanding of the poetic and practical qualities of different interiors through history. This is done by investigating some key London domestic interiors, supported by lectures that provide a contextual history of both interior design/architecture and the development of the interior design profession.</td> </tr> <tr> <td>This module builds on the drawing, digital imaging and 2D CAD skills you learnt in your previous Communication Skills module. You will study and practice more complex 2D CAD, as well as adding forms of digital imaging to explore video-based representations. You will also be introduced to the basics of digital fabrication, creating physical models from CAD and other digital files. The work is practical in nature and is designed to provide you with skills-based learning that supports and reinforces studio design work.</td> </tr> </tbody> </table> <h2>BA (Hons) Interior Design - Year 1 (Elective modules)</h2> <p>In addition you will need to choose two elective modules from the list below.</p> <p>Module Title</p> <table> <thead> <tr> </tr> </thead> <tbody> <tr> <td>This module covers the basic concepts and practice of digital photography, including understanding and use of the camera, lenses, and other basic photographic equipment. The module will address aesthetic principles as they relate to composition, space, exposure, light and colour. Technological requirements of digital formats will be discussed, such as formats and resolution. You will learn basic digital manipulation of images in preparation for creating a photo portfolio of images. You will produce photographs in response to seminars looking at the work of notable photographers, and give an oral presentation about the work of a photographer of your choice.</td> </tr> <tr> <td>On completion of this module you will be able to plan, shoot and edit a short film, possess a broad understanding of the short film as a genre, and its constraints and potential. In addition you will be responsible for aspects of directing, performing, shooting and editing your group production, thus acquiring valuable co-operative skills. You will gain an understanding of the importance of mise-en-scène, location, sound, camera angle, blocking, movement and cutting in the visual adaptation of a script idea. Finally post-production and editing will explore the full potential of conceptualising and evaluating your completed project, and audience/market considerations.</td> </tr> <tr> <td>Regent’s Connect is a portfolio of language, cultural and cross-cultural elective modules available to the student community at Regent’s University London. Connect Modules are designed to broaden your education, enhance your CV and give you those extra attributes employers are often looking for. You will gain valuable life skills such as the ability to communicate across cultural and linguistic boundaries, you will develop resilience and self-awareness. In an increasingly interconnected world, knowledge of a foreign language can facilitate transactions and provide skills which are crucial for success in a multicultural environment. Cultural sensitivity and intelligence will enable you to have more rewarding social interaction with people who have a different identity from your own and increase your global career prospects.</td> </tr> </tbody> </table> <h2>BA (Hons) Interior Design - Year 2 (Core modules)</h2> <p>Module Title</p> <table> <thead> <tr> </tr> </thead> <tbody> <tr> <td>In this module you will develop your explorations of how to creatively and positively intervene into existing buildings. This is the central activity of the interior designer - to work with what already exists, by adapting and transforming it for a new context and use. The site(s) and brief for the module will vary each year, with an emphasis on exploration of commercial programmes, such as retail, leisure or offices. If appropriate, the brief will be a Live Project.</td> </tr> <tr> <td>This module aims to expand your comprehension of design and the design process that positively informs your practice. Through the module, you will develop your research and analytical writing skills to also support your understanding of interior design and its practice.</td> </tr> <tr> <td>This module aims to give you a range of advanced digital skills for representation and communication of interior design proposals. You will investigate the narrative details of your work in relation to an identified concept and programme, and develop an understanding of the importance of ‘storytelling’ in developing, representing and communicating design proposals. Areas include 3D digital modelling, rendering and digital fabrication techniques.</td> </tr> <tr> <td>Throughout the term you will create a real-world event design that takes into account the site, context, brief, event planning and associated design elements - such as refreshment and relaxation facilities, exhibition stand design and promotional elements. You will be asked to design the end-of-year exhibition for final year students on the BA (Hons) Interior Design at Regents University London. You and your fellow students will be responsible for organising the building, installation and management of this event in the second part of the design module.</td> </tr> </tbody> </table> <h2>BA (Hons) Interior Design - Year 2 (Elective modules)</h2> <p>In addition you will need to choose two elective modules from the list below.</p> <p>Module Title</p> <table> <thead> <tr> </tr> </thead> <tbody> <tr> <td>This module aims to introduce you to advanced digital representational techniques, focused on digital film and animation as a tool for spatial storytelling. You will develop a project that explores two different approaches to representation and communication: film and animation, and complex digital fabrication. Each of these techniques will enable you to develop your abilities to communicate, thoughtfully and creatively, composed messages about the qualities of interior space, structure and form. Your work will be informed by in-depth study and analysis of how designers and others use film-making, animation and both virtual and physical model-making to communicate an underpinning narrative.</td> </tr> <tr> <td>The first professional practice module explores the nature of contemporary Interior Design professional practice. This module aims to develop your knowledge of the wider professional and regulatory context of professional practice, including the roles and responsibilities of all parties involved in the realisation of a design project, the professional institutions, the planning process, building regulations and health & safety. You will develop an online portfolio, CV and cover letter and practice oral presentation skills to aid you when applying for an internship.</td> </tr> <tr> <td>This module explores a variety of ways to interpret and analyse the inter-relationships between bodies, spaces and objects. It asks how design affects people’s lives by introducing contemporary research across visual and material culture, informed by subjects such as history, sociology, anthropology and psychology. The module enables engagement with, and debates about, how buildings, spaces and objects might be re-read and therefore understood in different and new ways, depending upon what set of ideas and approaches you draw on for such an analysis. It considers how design operates globally in consumer societies, as well as having the potential to make a difference. You will work together around the development and publication of a themed pamphlet, combining different kinds of writing and illustration.</td> </tr> <tr> <td>Regent’s Connect is a portfolio of language, cultural and cross-cultural elective modules available to the student community at Regent’s University London. Connect Modules are designed to broaden your education, enhance your CV and give you those extra attributes employers are often looking for. You will gain valuable life skills such as the ability to communicate across cultural and linguistic boundaries, you will develop resilience and self-awareness. In an increasingly interconnected world, knowledge of a foreign language can facilitate transactions and provide skills which are crucial for success in a multicultural environment. Cultural sensitivity and intelligence will enable you to have more rewarding social interaction with people who have a different identity from your own and increase your global career prospects.</td> </tr> </tbody> </table> <h2>BA (Hons) Interior Design - Year 3</h2> <p>Module Title</p> <table> <thead> <tr> </tr> </thead> <tbody> <tr> <td>The whole year provides you with an opportunity to demonstrate your learning, creativity and professionalism through the development of a single design project of appropriate scale and ambition. Typically students select from a given site or set of sites and develop a strategy for its redevelopment and reuse. This module concentrates on site selection, analysis, feasibility, and concept development leading to the development of a brief for a suitable building programme. This brief is then developed into a three-dimensional organisational and conceptual strategy for the building.</td> </tr> <tr> <td>You are required to embark on an intense process of investigation, reflection, and writing in order to produce a 6,000 word illustrated dissertation. In the first semester you are required to choose and develop a research topic and immerse yourself in an area that has specific interest to you relating to an aspect of architecture, interiors, and design. This research informs the work undertaken in your Major Project, which leads to the creation of the final design project. Following the submission of a formal proposal document, you will develop a first draft of at least 3,000 words comprising an introduction, literature review and some chapter outlines.</td> </tr> <tr> <td>The module aims at building an understanding of the administrative, financial and marketing issues involved in setting up your own design business. You will have the opportunity to create a brand idea and graphic identity, aimed at different types of audiences you might encounter as a designer and develop your abilities to compete successfully in this market internationally.</td> </tr> <tr> <td>This module provides you with an opportunity to demonstrate your learning from the rest of the programme through the development of a single design project of appropriate scale and ambition. You will work independently to develop the design concept, programme and strategic decisions established in Term one, into complex and resolved spatial transformations within an existing context. The Major Project provides an opportunity for you to focus on your personal interest and ambitions as a designer and to create a body of work preparing you for professional practice or postgraduate studies.</td> </tr> <tr> <td>The module aims to emphasise that technology and sustainability are integral to every aspect and at every scale of a design project, from the impact of environmental, economic and social conditions of the site on the initial design strategy and programme, to the relationship with the host building, to the materiality and construction of the proposal and down to the minute detail of the door handle. The module focuses on the development of your understanding of important technical and legal requirements as a professional designer. Within this module you will identify and develop technological and environmental aspects of your individual design project, in order to support the design development of the Major Project from the initial design strategy to the final detailed resolution.</td> </tr> <tr> <td>Building on your research, development and draft writing in your first semester, you will now complete a 6,000 word illustrated dissertation. This will include a substantial conclusion that draws themes together and answers the research questions you have set yourself. This research informs the work undertaken in Major Project Design.</td> </tr> </tbody> </table> <h3>How to apply</h3> <p>Applying to study at Regent's University London is quick and easy. We have put together some helpful information to guide you through the process. We accept direct applications and there is no application fee.</p> <p><strong>Not received your results yet?</strong></p> <p>That's fine, you can still apply even without your exam results. We can issue a conditional offer without your results. You just need be clear in your application which qualifications you are currently studying for.</p> <h2><strong>Application deadlines</strong></h2> <p>If you have not uploaded the relevant supporting documents during the online application process, you should ensure that we have the below supporting documents as soon as you have completed your application. These can be sent to the Regent’s Admissions Department via email to [email protected].</p> <ul> <li>Copies of academic transcripts and certificates from all previous studies (i.e. secondary school and/or university certificates)</li> <li>One academic letter of recommendation</li> <li>A 300-500 word personal statement outlining the reasons for applying to your chosen programme, how you feel you will benefit from the programme of study, what contributions you will make to the University and how this will help your future career aspirations.</li> <li>A copy of your passport photograph (ID) page</li> <li>If you are not a native English speaker, proof of your English proficiency</li> </ul> <p><strong>Credit Transfer</strong></p> <ul> <li>If you’ve already studied part of a degree course elsewhere, you may be able apply for Recognition of Prior Learning (RPL) and join the programme at an advanced entry point. If you’d like to request entry part-way through a programme, make sure you state this clearly in your statement of purpose and provide us with the transcripts and module descriptions for the relevant study.</li> </ul> <h3>Step 2 Receive a response to your application</h3> <p>You can expect to receive a decision on your application within 10 working days of receipt of your completed application and supporting documents.</p> <p>We will assess whether you meet our entry requirements and will notify you of the decision via email. UCAS applicants will also receive official notification via the UCAS system.</p> <p>For some of our programmes, the selection process may include an interview or audition. Interviews/auditions can take the form of a one-to-one interview, group interview or portfolio review which may be conducted by telephone or as a Skype call. Arrangements of these are made between the Admissions Department and the applicant.</p> <h3>Step 3 Accepting your offer</h3> <p>If you wish to accept the offer you must pay the advance tuition fee deposit (non-refundable) to confirm your place.</p> <h3>Step 4 After you have accepted your place</h3> <p>Closer to the start of the term, the Admissions Team will send information regarding the registration process. This will include information on completing your online enrolment prior to your arrival as well as a checklist of documents you will need to bring with you to fully register onto the programme.</p> <h3>Information for international students</h3> <p>If you are an overseas student requiring visa sponsorship to study in the UK, our team will be in touch with information on applying for your student visa and the documents you will need. More information can be found on our visas and immigration page.</p> <h2>Scholarships and funding</h2> <p>Funding for UK, and EU nationals, as well as students with the status of Migrant Worker.</p> <h3>Annual programme degree level fee (September 2020 - May 2021)</h3> <p>£18,000</p> <h3>What do fees include?</h3> <p>Fees cover the cost of all tuition and access to the University’s IT infrastructure and library learning resources. Fees are presented for the first level of study which equates to two terms.</p> <h3>What other costs should I budget for?</h3> <p>You will need to budget additional funds for accommodation and living expenses, travel, and any additional trips, visits, activities or courses (such as Summer programmes) that you choose to participate in outside of the tuition offered as part of the programme. You will also need to budget for materials that you will use for garment construction during the programme.</p> <p>The library hold a limited number of copies of core text books and where possible in e-format. You will be encouraged to purchase your own text books and will need to budget approximately £80-£100 per year, depending on your programme of study.</p> <h3>When are fees paid?</h3> <ul> <li>An initial non-refundable advance deposit paid when you accept your offer of a place</li> <li>The advance deposit is allocated against the first term’s fees</li> <li>Tuition fees (including fees for subsequent terms) are due two weeks in advance of classes commencing</li> </ul> <h3>Calculating annual fee increases</h3> <ul> <li>The University sets tuition fees on an annual basis in line with the University's financial year which runs from 1 August to 31 July</li> <li>The fees quoted here are for one academic year of study</li> <li>Fees for the foundation level year are lower than fees for the subsequent BA programme. As you progress to the full BA programme after the foundation year, your fees will increase (see above for the September 2019 entry fee to give a guide price)</li> <li>Fees for subsequent years of study are subject to fee inflation</li> <li>The University aims to keep annual fee increases in line with the University’s cost inflation. The expectation is that this will be no greater than UK consumer price inflation (CPI) plus 3%. There are occasionally variations to this dictated by the costs of running specific programmes or facilities required for our programmes</li> <li>As a registered charity, all fee increases are subject to approval of the Trustee Board thus ensuring that affordability for our students remains a primary concern in any decisions regarding fee increases</li> </ul> <h3>Teaching and Assessment</h3> <ul> <li>Lectures on the history and theory of interior design</li> <li>Hands-on design work in the studio</li> <li>Communications sessions on skills like drawing and auto CAD</li> </ul> <h3>Contact hours and expected workload</h3> <p>You will have 15 hours contact time per week that includes studio work, lectures and seminars.</p> <h3>Methods of assessment</h3> <p>There are no exams on this programme. Your assessment will be through project work, which will include:</p> <ul> <li>Individual tutorials</li> <li>Group discussions</li> </ul> <p>The Major Design Project allows you to demonstrate what you've learnt throughout the programme. You will select a site and develop a strategy for its redevelopment and reuse. This will include producing drawings and models for the final year show.</p> <h3>Disability support</h3> <p>We welcome and support students with a wide range of disabilities and health concerns. This includes learning difficulties, visual and hearing impairments, mental health difficulties, autism spectrum conditions, mobility difficulties, and temporary or chronic health conditions.</p> <p>Our dedicated Disability Officer is here to support you. We ask that you speak with Student Registry and our Disability Officer as early as you can to enable us to support you. Find out more about our disability support and contact us.</p> <h3>Academic requirements</h3> <p>A Regent’s education provides you with a high level of personal attention, and this begins from the moment you apply to study with us. We want to understand who you are and what your skills and interests may be – we are interested in your potential, as well as your prior achievements. We review each application comprehensively and on its individual merit, considering all of your skills, interests and attributes.</p> <p>Typically, we will make an offer to a student holding at least 5 GCSEs at grades A-C / 9-4 or international equivalent including Mathematics. Regent’s receives applications from over 170 countries and assesses all international qualifications, for example, we would make an offer of minimum 2.5 GPA for the American High School Diploma.</p> <h3>English requirements</h3> <ul> <li>IELTS: Overall score of 5.5, with a minimum of 5.5 in each individual component</li> <li>GCSE/IGCSE English, grade C / 4 (for IGCSE certificates, please provide the Supplementary Certifying Statement with the breakdown of component grades)</li> </ul> <p>This list is not exhaustive, we will review the English qualifications you have as part of your application and be in contact if we require anything further.</p> <p>For applicants who wish to improve their English language proficiency, please see our English language courses.</p> <h3>Regent's English Password Test (REPT)</h3> <p>For offer holders able to visit us in London, we can provide an on-campus English diagnostic test known as the Regent’s English Password Test (REPT). This test must be arranged in advance. To find out more information and to book a test, please visit the REPT page. Please note, the REPT test will be free of charge until 31 May 2020. From 1 June 2020, there will be a £50 charge to take the REPT test.</p> <p>We are based in central London and have strong links with industry. Throughout the programme you will have plenty of opportunities to network with a range of industry professionals. You will get to showcase your work at external events and, in your final year, participate in our show to gain vital industry exposure.</p> <p>After graduation, you will be equipped to work in a range of interior design disciplines including architecture, retail, exhibition, hospitality, residential and workplace design. You may choose to work within an agency or open your own practice.</p> <p>Using our strong links with industry and showcasing our students’ work at external events, we have helped recent graduates to gain positions at a number of highly-regarded design agencies.</p> <p>The Regent’s University London BA (Hons) Interior Design programme aims to prepare its students for a creative and professional career across various areas of interior design, both in full-time employment and freelance scenarios. These commonly fall into a number of categories and associated fields as diverse as:</p> <ul> <li>Exhibition Design</li> <li>Design Consultant</li> </ul> <p>Some students also opt to go onto postgraduate education, or move into associated research or project management fields.</p> <h2> </h2> Tue, 02/18/2020 - 14:04 1430802 1430802 BA (Hons) Sociology https://research-jobs.net/program/ba-hons-sociology-1430744 <h3>Sociology is a craft and a vocation, and engaging with it can be life-changing. Once you’ve acquired a sociological imagination, the world is never quite the same.</h3> <h3>Why study BA Sociology at Goldsmiths?</h3> <ul> <li>Sociology offers illuminating insights into our lives. This degree examines how societies are organised, how people are united and divided in different cultural and social arrangements, and how people view their societies and their identities.</li> <li>You'll use innovative methods to study everyday life and contemporary phenomena. These methods could include interviews, visual sociology (photography and film), ethnography (researching and recording an environment from the point of view of the group you’re studying), big data surveys, or small focus groups.</li> <li>Because you’ll be generating data of your own, conducting primary research, and analysing lots of evidence, you’ll be developing some great skills and experiencing what it means to be a sociologist from day one. </li> </ul> <ul> <li>Our staff teach their own specialisms – they're pioneers in their fields and write the books that are on reading lists across the country.</li> </ul> <ul> <li>Recent employers of Goldsmiths sociology graduates include the BBC, Big Issue North, Holocaust Educational Trust, Oxfam, Tate and the civil service. They’re working as researchers, human rights campaigners, teachers, diversity officers and producers.</li> </ul> <p>Contact the department</p> <h2>What you'll study</h2> <h3>Overview</h3> <p>The first year of the degree gets you thinking sociologically and critically, and introduces the ways in which sociological knowledge of societies has been shaped by disputes about theories and methods. First year modules address problems that have interested sociologists in their attempts to account for the world we live in. You will start to understand how the meaning derived from sociological investigations operates in cultural processes, and look at the methods that have been developed by sociologists to produce sociological knowledge. </p> <p>Compulsory modules in the second and third years cover the main approaches to sociological thought, and their implications for understanding contemporary societies. You develop a rich knowledge of the variety of sociological reasoning and research.</p> <p>In the third year you take a compulsory module in contemporary social theory and society, and you choose four options.</p> <h3>Year 1 (credit level 4)</h3> <p>You'll be assigned a personal tutor, who also acts as an academic tutor. Tutors oversee your academic work and progress over the year.</p> <p>You take six compulsory modules:</p> <p>Year 1 compulsory modules</p> <table> <thead> <tr> </tr> </thead> <tbody> <tr> <td>15 credits <p>In this module our approach to the ‘sociological imagination’ is to understand Sociology as a discipline that has its own history. That history has influenced how we do Sociology today. It has given us different approaches, perspectives and different methods. These didn’t arrive all at once, but arose at different times, often in response to social events or changes in philosophical thinking. New perspectives and questions have arisen that have taken Sociology in new directions. We have to gain a sense of the history of our discipline in order to see where Sociology came from and how that history has changed. Those changes in approach have shaped the Sociology we study today, and we have to understand as much as we can about it in order to understand our own inheritances. But we also have to read this history critically, because it doesn’t have to determine how we do Sociology in the future.</p> </td> <td>15 credits</td> </tr> <tr> <td>15 credits <p>This module is lecture and workshop based and aims to introduce students to the methods that sociologists have developed to analyse their societies and to produce sociological knowledge. You will also develop core skills in methods of research by being introduced to the practice of sociological research. Methods are introduced in relation to key sociological topics and research traditions that are closely identified with them, thus allowing students to confront methods as real practices rather than abstractions. The aim is as far as possible to build on the concepts and the issues that are being discussed in other first-year modules.</p> </td> <td>15 credits</td> </tr> <tr> <td>30 credits <p>This module aims to introduce you to the ‘sociological imagination’. What is distinctive about Sociology? With a focus on knowledge and power, the module looks at how Sociology has developed, with an emphasis on the study of relations between individuals and groups in modern industrial societies.</p> <p>This module will:•introduce students to key sociological approaches to social divisions and differences•foster students’ knowledge and understanding of the development of sociological thinking through the study of classical and contemporary accounts of social power, identity and inequalityenable students to analyse and contrast differing approaches to the study of core sociological topics, including class, gender, race, religion and nation</p> </td> <td>30 credits</td> </tr> <tr> <td>30 credits <p>This module is primarily concerned with the relations between culture and social processes, and approaches these in a number of ways: by outlining various sociological uses of ‘culture’, by identifying the role of culture in examples of macrosocial phenomena (eg education, consumption, the city), and by discussing microsociological analyses of the role of culture in social interaction.</p> </td> <td>30 credits</td> </tr> <tr> <td>15 credits <p>This module is lecture and workshop based and aims to introduce students to the methods that sociologists have developed to analyse their societies and to produce sociological knowledge. You will also develop core skills in methods of research by being introduced to the practice of sociological research. Methods are introduced in relation to key sociological topics and research traditions that are closely identified with them, thus allowing students to confront methods as real practices rather than abstractions. The aim is as far as possible to build on the concepts and the issues that are being discussed in other first-year modules.</p> </td> <td>15 credits</td> </tr> <tr> <td>15 credits <p>In this module our approach to the ‘sociological imagination’ is to understand Sociology as a discipline that has its own history. That history has influenced how we do Sociology today. It has given us different approaches, perspectives and different methods. These didn’t arrive all at once, but arose at different times, often in response to social events or changes in philosophical thinking. New perspectives and questions have arisen that have taken Sociology in new directions. We have to gain a sense of the history of our discipline in order to see where Sociology came from and how that history has changed. Those changes in approach have shaped the Sociology we study today, and we have to understand as much as we can about it in order to understand our own inheritances. But we also have to read this history critically, because it doesn’t have to determine how we do Sociology in the future.</p> </td> <td>15 credits</td> </tr> </tbody> </table> <p>You will take the following compulsory modules:</p> <p>Year 2 compulsory modules</p> <table> <thead> <tr> </tr> </thead> <tbody> <tr> <td>15 credits <p>This module aims to develop the introduction to sociological theory that you received in the first year, whilst also preparing you to engage with critiques and the most current developments in the third year. It will help you to develop your understanding of sociological analysis through considering its origins in the classical tradition as well as discussing contemporary issues.</p> <p>In the first half of the module, we explore five key thinkers and their central concerns as a way of exploring distinct approaches to social analysis. In the second half of the module, we explore five key concepts as a way of thinking through how social theory is put to work as a tool to understand and illuminate the social world.</p> <p>Throughout these lectures we will explore different assumptions about the nature of social order and different approaches to practice. Throughout the module, we examine the way in which different kinds of sociological explanation are grounded in different assumptions about the way the social world works.</p> <p>On completing this module, you should have a good understanding of the theoretical positions that form the point of departure of current debates in social theory and in sociological research. You will have practiced thinking in different ways and will be able to make more informed choices about the tools and concepts you use to think about the central issues in sociological analysis.</p> </td> <td>15 credits</td> </tr> <tr> <td>15 credits <p>The module builds on material already introduced in the first year, and will provide additional perspectives for the historical analysis of modernity. There is a growing consensus in contemporary scholarship on stressing the interdependence and complexity of the processes which contributed to the distinctiveness of modern societies, rather than assigning primacy to any one factor or process – be it economic, political, cultural or social. This module places an emphasis on historical reflexivity: it will seek to illustrate how historical processes, however multiple and complex, are not simply 'given' as historical objects but reflect the adoption of particular perspectives that are themselves historically specific.</p> </td> <td>15 credits</td> </tr> <tr> <td>15 credits <p>All sociologists have had to deal with some conflict between the idea of sociological knowledge as scientific, guided by reason, and human subjectivity, which gives us differing conceptions of what is real or true. This module looks at some problems in finding out about the social world, dealing with values, and interpreting social reality or realities. </p> </td> <td>15 credits</td> </tr> <tr> <td>15 credits <p>This begins by focusing on how culture has been conceived in the major traditions of sociological thought and moves on to consider the significance of the development of mass communications research and cultural studies for a sociology of culture</p> </td> <td>15 credits</td> </tr> <tr> <td>15 credits</td> </tr> <tr> <td>15 credits</td> </tr> </tbody> </table> <p>Year 2 option modules</p> <table> <thead> <tr> </tr> </thead> <tbody> <tr> <td>15 credits <p>The module will cover contemporary approaches to the body and especially sexuality, beginning with an introduction to Foucaultian critiques and associated theories of performativity. It will provoke a series of questions about social constructionism and materiality, inviting students to evaluate more process oriented theories of performativity as well as those emphasising the productive work of speech acts (Butler). The terms ‘drugs’ and ‘technology’ in the title give emphasis to the way in which the body will be posed as always already engaged with phenomena that is more commonly deemed external. This conceptual approach will introduce students in second year to more contemporary debates and particularly debates that offer a more applied approach to inquiries of the body in relation to health, medicine and everyday technologies.</p> </td> <td>15 credits</td> </tr> <tr> <td>15 credits <p>‘Leisure is free time’. But is it? We need only think about the annual subscription to gymnasiums to recognise that leisure-time really isn’t ‘free-time’. ‘Leisure is a marker for time away from work’. But we need only think of the time of the harried vacation to know that the clock-time of work never ceases to operate. In critical theory, leisure-time is defined as functionally dependent on the labour market system. Indeed leisure is revealed as big business, as leisure-time becomes ever more central to consumer culture. This module examines the interconnections between leisure, culture and society. </p> </td> <td>15 credits</td> </tr> <tr> <td>15 credits <p>How is space stabalised and de-stabalised? How do we imagine space? How is space invented? These questions will be considered from within different contexts, where space is understood to be invaded. The arrival of outsiders (on the grounds of not being human or the right kind of human) in places not demarcated for them will form the basis of several case studies on this module.</p> <p>The production, representation and performance of space will be central. Both theoretical readings and sociological fieldwork will form the basis of the learning. Students will consider a series of case studies from public and private domains. These will include cities, public spaces, political sites, national ceremonies and animals in the civic space.</p> </td> <td>15 credits</td> </tr> <tr> <td>15 credits <p>The French sociologist Pierre Bourdieu once noted that ‘sociology and art make an odd couple’: indeed whilst sociological investigations on the arts and aesthetics can be traced back to the founders of the discipline, they remain, like their subject matter, a diverse and changing field.</p> <p>Still, in recent years the sociology of art has been emerging from its marginality, increasingly combining theoretical investigations with empirical research on contemporary artistic phenomena. This module will introduce key themes and authors in the sociology of art, classical and contemporary.</p> <p>It will outline both a history of theoretical approaches and an overview of major results and trends in empirical research; key case studies will illustrate and interrogate the thematic core of each lecture. The lectures are divided in two parts, enshrined in a thematic approach that highlights crucial issues, such as: is art about beauty? What is an artist? Is art beyond society? Should art be political?</p> </td> <td>15 credits</td> </tr> <tr> <td>15 credits <p>Organisations make strange things happen. Organisations can cause serious problems. Some organisations can be quite useful or may even be necessary for doing things well together. Schools, churches, banks, supermarkets, the state and indeed the university not only shape the world but also shape the way we see the world and the way we see ourselves. This module explores the role of organisations in social life through a range of theoretical approaches and case studies.</p> </td> <td>15 credits</td> </tr> <tr> <td>15 credits <p>The module draws on work from cultural studies and sociology to think critically about the relationships between forms of cultural representation and the construction of modern self-identity. The module will examine different approaches to representation such as those developed in the work of Ferdinand de Saussure, Roland Barthes and Stuart Hall. We will also discuss more recent theoretical approaches to difference based upon recognition of generosity and cosmopolitanism. Across the module, examples will be taken from areas such as advertising, photography, tattooing and other cultural forms. </p> </td> <td>15 credits</td> </tr> <tr> <td>15 credits <p>This is a visually oriented urban sociology module in which students are taught close observation of urban space in broader context and required to work through a combination of photography and writing. This module introduces students to key themes in sociology – class, ethnicity, space, time, social inequalities, social change - through active engagement with the urban environment around New Cross specifically and more generally other areas of London. It combines classroom lectures with lectures, observation, workshops and other activities embedded in urban walks. </p> </td> <td>15 credits</td> </tr> <tr> <td>15 credits <p>This module will introduce students to basic concepts developed from Marxist theory that are now ubiquitous elsewhere such as class, value, alienation, exploitation, and fetishism. Each week will focus on a basic concept; start with its original source, explain, contextualise, and trace its development and critique as it progresses through social theory and sometimes into popular uses. Each concept will be interrogated then developed in relation to contemporary issues, exploring its significance and explanatory power as a critical sociological tool.</p> </td> <td>15 credits</td> </tr> <tr> <td>15 credits <p>This module explores a selection of approaches to the sociological study of the body, as well as substantive problem-areas where the body has become an important focus of research. You address the contrast between traditions that approach the body as an object (the body we have), those that approach the body as a subject (the body we are), and those that address the body in terms of performativity (the body we become). </p> </td> <td>15 credits</td> </tr> <tr> <td>15 credits <p>The first part of the module is primarily concerned with establishing a firm grasp of the fundamental approaches to the political sociology of democratic societies, whist the second introduces debates – over planning, ethnic cleansing, neoliberal ‘de-democratisation’ – that will allow us to think through the relevance of the classical categories of political sociology to the study of contemporary societies. </p> </td> <td>15 credits</td> </tr> <tr> <td>15 credits <p>This module considers crimes against humanity. In terms of social theory, it asks what it might mean to say that something is a crime against humanity as a whole, or against the human condition, rather than simply a crime against a particular state or a particular national law. You will consider the meaning of key concepts such as humanity, state, universal jurisdiction, and individual responsibility.</p> <p>The introduction to this module will also look at sociological theories of nationalism and the distinction between civic and ethnic nationalism. It will go on to consider totalitarianism, comparing Bauman's analysis of totalitarianism as a prototype of 'modernity' with Arendt's understanding of totalitarianism as a revolt against modern forms.</p> <p>You will study what kinds of behaviour constitute crimes against humanity; how, why and by whom such crimes are committed, and consider what kinds of international legal instruments and institutions have arisen to designate crimes against humanity as such and to try to prevent or punish them. The module will also explore the difficulties of cultural representation of crimes against humanity, through movies including Shoah, Schindler's List, Ararat, Hotel Rwanda and The Act of Killing.</p> <p>Throughout this module, you will develop a materialist sociological methodology: using concepts to understand case studies and case studies to shed light on concepts.</p> </td> <td>15 credits</td> </tr> <tr> <td>15 credits <p>With migration frequently presented as a situation of ‘crisis’, this module considers broader contexts and longer histories of migration to and within Europe, and will consider the academic field migration as an inter-disciplinary field of study.</p> <p>Exploring contemporary literature from writers and theorists working in a European context, the module will present students with starting points from which to consider migration using core sociological concepts, particularly of place, ‘race’ and power.</p> <p>The module will follow a migration pathway, with focus points considered through lenses of leaving, moving, arriving and staying:</p> <ul> <li><strong>Leaving</strong> - We will examine those legal frameworks and international agreements relevant to migration, and will explore the uneasy distinction between so-called forced migration and economic migration.</li> <li><strong>Moving</strong> - We will consider borders and immigration controls, border theories, and the differentiated legal statutes of migrating people as linked to colonial and postcolonial relationships.</li> <li><strong>Arriving</strong> - We will reflect on notions of displacement, exile, integration strategies and policies, representations of migrants and racism, and examples of activism with and by migrants. Staying – We will look at migration and cities, and focus on experiences of young migrants in particular.</li> </ul> </td> <td>15 credits</td> </tr> </tbody> </table> <p>You will take the following compulsory modules:</p> <p>Year 3 compulsory modules</p> <table> <thead> <tr> </tr> </thead> <tbody> <tr> <td>15 credits <p>The module aims to introduce students to a range of contemporary debates, which relate broadly to the theorization of identity and identification. The first half of the module will examine a variety of theories concerned with the examination of social class, gender, race, ethnicity and sexuality, and the way in which wider structural concerns intersect to both enable and constrain identification. Lectures 6-8 build on the ideas presented in the first half of the module in order to examine the relationship of identity to social memory, before the final two lectures consider the importance of emotion to process of identification.</p> </td> <td>15 credits</td> </tr> <tr> <td>15 credits <p>To what extent do changes in contemporary societies demand new forms of sociological theorising? What particular challenges do these changes represent to contemporary social theorists? The really big issue here is ‘globalization’, which apparently represents something quite new in human history. We explore what this term means in the first lecture, but the questions it raises are an over-arching theme of the module. Globalization is driven by neo-liberal logics, but it also opens up new possibilities. Globalization can be interpreted in different ways, but there is no doubt that it is only possible because of developments in digital communication. The role of the media, then, is especially important in enabling globalization. At a minimum, globalization involves flows across borders – of money, ideas, things, images, even (usually with a lot more difficulty) of people. It also involves the possibility of new forms of social relations, mobilities, and mediated connections, cultural, social, economic and personal, from the local to the local, and in specific places (like cities), as well as transnationally, internationally and even supranationally. This is not to say that face-to-face interaction loses its importance, but it too is altered in the contemporary world.</p> </td> <td>15 credits</td> </tr> </tbody> </table> <p>You also:</p> <ul> <li>Write a Dissertation worth 30 credits. This is independent research, supported by classes and subject specialists, resulting in an 8,000-word dissertation in a topic of your own choice.</li> <li>Choose four Sociology options<strong>. </strong>Those recently available have included:</li> </ul> <p>Year 3 Sociology modules</p> <table> <thead> <tr> </tr> </thead> <tbody> <tr> <td>15 credits <p>This examines some of the conceptual and political problems that have clustered around sociological analysis of ‘race’ and racism. It is comparative in focus and encompasses both historical and theoretical material. It introduces some of the major sociological paradigms of ‘race relations’ analysis and relates them to a variety of examples. </p> </td> <td>15 credits</td> </tr> <tr> <td>15 credits <p>Globalisations is both a dominant discourse of powerful actors on the world scene, as well as the main target for one of the most vibrant new social movements. This module aims to develop a critical and historical understanding of the issues which inform contemporary debates on globalisation. </p> </td> <td>15 credits</td> </tr> <tr> <td>15 credits <p>This module is about the relationships between vision, sensuality and the production of truth, knowledge, and identity in Euro-American cultures. It asks: how do historically and culturally specific ways of seeing and sensing shape ways of knowing (epistemology) and ways of being (ontology)? What are the relationships between vision, sensuality and power?</p> <p>What are the epistemological, methodological and ethical demands that are made upon sociology in its encounters with the visual and the sensual? Through discussion of topics such as Deigo Velázquez' 1656 painting Las Meninas, the camera and photography, and the visual manipulation of identity through ‘passing’, the module will provide a forum for thinking about the pleasures, dangers and contingencies present in visualising the social world. </p> </td> <td>15 credits</td> </tr> <tr> <td>15 credits <p>This approaches childhood as a socio-historically constructed concept, with material, technological and political dimensions and consequences. Through a mixture of theoretical readings and issue-based discussions, you explore the regulated constitution of childhood and its changing parameters. Some of the substantive areas explored include: changing household patterns from the child’s perspective, child sexual abuse, infancy and foetal life, children’s literature. </p> </td> <td>15 credits</td> </tr> <tr> <td>15 credits <p>The module approaches learning about social research through data analysis. Data analysis is used as an exploratory device a means to generate questions about topics such as class, gender and race and then attempt to suggest possible answers supported by evidence. The module is made possible by the existence of vast archives of sociological data that can be accessed from the ESRC survey resource network including the qualidata archive.</p> </td> <td>15 credits</td> </tr> <tr> <td>15 credits <p>Conventional ways of demarcating economic, power, and cultural relationships have long relied up notions of "North and South", "first and third", "east and west", "colonial and post-colonial." These means of envisioning the world and of tracing the intersections among diverse places, times, and peoples, while maintaining some salience, no longer seem to grasp what is really taking place.</p> <p>The module, in particular, explores the emerging relationships between Southeast Asia, South Asia, the Middle East and Africa—articulations that have been elaborated over a long history but which now take shape in new and powerful ways.</p> <p>Additionally, there are a plurality of "worlds” that enjoin different actors and spaces that cannot be easily defined according to geopolitical understandings--where information infrastructure, design, telecommunications, and travel combine to create new possibilities of transaction. The module looks at how these worlds affect our understandings of sociality, actors, and collective life, in general, and the shape and operations of emerging powers in particular.</p> </td> <td>15 credits</td> </tr> <tr> <td>15 credits <p>This module will engage with issues of privacy, surveillance and security. Recent years have seen a huge growth in demands for: certainty in the verification of identity; accountability of individual and organisational activity; and mechanisms designed to accumulate knowledge of what individuals and groups may do in the near future. First, the module will provide a background to the historical development of surveillance and the mobilizing of notions of security through specific political regimes.</p> <p>Second, the module will investigate contemporary issues in privacy, surveillance and security including: the rise of CCTV and the visualization of order, airports and spaces of disciplined consumption, the management of everyday life and claims regarding the death of privacy. Third, the module will end by investigating the possibility of addressing tensions between privacy, surveillance and security issues.</p> <p>In particular we will focus on technologies as solutions, market based mechanisms and the valuation of privacy, and the variety of interventions, engagements and accountabilities with regard to surveillance that have been developed in recent years.</p> </td> <td>15 credits</td> </tr> <tr> <td>15 credits <p>This module engages students in close readings of a small number of contemporary philosophers and thinkers who provoke us to consider questions of politics and alterity (or ‘difference’) anew. It aims to give students a sense of the constitution of politics as a relational and agonistic complex of power relations. We will consider how the chosen thinkers have attempted to define power and ‘the political’ and how they help us theorise political dynamics. Our texts will give us the opportunity to reflect on contemporary political situations and events.</p> </td> <td>15 credits</td> </tr> <tr> <td>15 credits <p>During the term we will explore multiple dimensions of the concept of subjectivity in relation problems of health and medicine: the epistemological dimension, where ‘subjectivity’ implies a reference to the subject/object dichotomy and to different forms of knowledge; the phenomenological dimension, where ‘subjectivity’ points to questions of embodiment, experience, and transformation; and the political dimension where ‘subjectivity’ points to the construction of different types of subject within different forms of governance. We will trace a path across these dimensions by examining a range of phenomena at the margins of conventional/mainstream biomedical knowledge, from contested illnesses to placebo/nocebo effects, to pedagogical programmes designed to restore to medicine the element of ‘art’ it has allegedly lost to science. I very much look forward to working with you on these topics this term, and hope that you in turn will find the work exciting and productive.</p> </td> <td>15 credits</td> </tr> <tr> <td>15 credits <p>The question of power cuts across across many school and texts of modern and contemporary philosophy. Though principally associated with the field of political philosophy - from ancient essays on the relation between ethics, justice and political power, to contemporary explorations of power as a multi-dimensional social relation - power has also been crucial to debates in ontology and metaphysics, as well as to philosophy's complex interactions with other disciplines, from sociology to psychiatry, anthropology to feminism and gender studies.</p> <p>Possible questions for consideration include: What is the history of philosophy's conceptualisation of power? What is power's relation to violence, authority, and domination? What is the relation between power and resistance? How are theories of power linked to theories of the subject? In what way is the gendered and racialised character of social and political power significant for philosophical reflection? How is power exerted on bodies? What is the relationship between power and right, as well as between power and justice? What different philosophical approaches can be applied to the question of power?</p> <p>Readings will be selected from all areas of philosophy and from related disciplines, and will be particularly solicited from women and other groups historically underrepresented in the field.</p> </td> <td>15 credits</td> </tr> <tr> <td>15 credits <p>This module takes an interdisciplinary approach in order to chart the gender dimensions of transnational migrations in the contemporary world. As a growing number of migration scholars emphasize, a gender perspective is crucial to orienting our theories and understanding of migration and global human geographies in the twenty-first century. You will be encouraged to address questions such as: Why are men and women increasingly on the move on a global scale? What do male and female migrants do in the so-called countries of destination in the Global North? How does gender help us to understand the migration trajectories of migrants? How are gendered migrations linked to processes of social reproduction?</p> <p>The module will be divided in two parts. First, you will analyse the recent history and political economy of migrations through the lenses of gender, as well as ‘race’ and class theories. We will focus particularly on the notions of ‘feminisation of migrations’ and ‘crisis of social reproduction’ in order to examine their root causes and dimensions. Second, you will learn to explore the social and cultural representations of migrants in the Global North and to identify the ways these representations can be scrutinized through theories of gender, ‘race’ and class. We will thus take a critical perspective on key concepts such as ‘sexualization of racism’, ‘racialization of sexism’, ‘gendered assimilation’, ‘civic integration of migrants’ and ‘gendered colonial technologies of domination’.</p> <p>Taking a case study approach throughout the course, you will also learn how to evaluate the feasibility and appropriateness of different methodologies and techniques of social research when undertaking empirical research projects involving migrants.</p> </td> <td>15 credits</td> </tr> <tr> <td>15 credits <p>What do humans think about animals? How does this thinking shape the ethics, politics and methods of animal-human relations? Do animals think? What are the implications if they do?</p> <p>This module explores how animal-human relations have been understood in the work of Renaissance and early modern philosophers through to contemporary animal liberationists, analytic and continental philosophers, feminists and posthumanist theorists.</p> <p>Topics include the role of thought and rationality in understanding animal-human relations; animal ethics; animal suffering and animal deaths; transformative relations with animals; anthropomorphism; animal cognition, emotions and morality; animal cooperation and resistance; inter-species ethics.</p> </td> <td>15 credits</td> </tr> </tbody> </table> <h3>Teaching style</h3> <p>This programme is mainly taught through scheduled learning - a mixture of lectures, seminars and workshops. You’ll also be expected to undertake a significant amount of independent study. This includes carrying out required and additional reading, preparing topics for discussion, and producing essays or project work.</p> <p>The following information gives an indication of the typical proportions of learning and teaching for each year of this programme*:</p> <ul> <li>Year 1 - 13% scheduled learning, 87% independent learning</li> <li>Year 2 - 13% scheduled learning, 87% independent learning</li> <li>Year 3 - 11% scheduled learning, 89% independent learning</li> </ul> <h3>How you’ll be assessed</h3> <p>You’ll be assessed by a variety of methods, depending on your module choices. These include coursework, extended essays, reports, presentations, practice-based projects or essays/logs, group projects, reflective essays, and seen and unseen written examinations.</p> <p>The following information gives an indication of how you can typically expect to be assessed on each year of this programme*:</p> <ul> <li>Year 1 - 63% coursework, 38% written exam</li> <li>Year 2 - 50% coursework, 50% written exam</li> <li>Year 3 - 100% coursework</li> </ul> <p>*Please note that these are averages are based on enrolments for 2018/19. Each student’s time in teaching, learning and assessment activities will differ based on individual module choices. Find out more about how this information is calculated.</p> <h3>Credits and levels of learning</h3> <p>An undergraduate honours degree is made up of 360 credits – 120 at Level 4, 120 at Level 5 and 120 at Level 6. If you are a full-time student, you will usually take Level 4 modules in the first year, Level 5 in the second, and Level 6 modules in your final year. A standard module is worth 30 credits. Some programmes also contain 15-credit half modules or can be made up of higher-value parts, such as a dissertation or a Major Project.</p> <p>Download the programme specification. If you would like an earlier version of the programme specification, please contact the Quality Office.</p> <p>Please note that due to staff research commitments not all of these modules may be available every year.</p> <h2>Entry requirements</h2> <p><strong>A-level:</strong> BBB<strong>International Baccalaureate:</strong> 33 points overall with Three HL subjects at 655 <strong>Access:</strong> Pass with 45 Level 3 credits including 30 Distinctions and a number of merits/passes in subject-specific modules<strong>Scottish qualifications:</strong> BBBBC (Higher) or BBC (Advanced Higher)<strong>European Baccalaureate:</strong> 75%</p> <h3>International qualifications</h3> <p>If English isn’t your first language, you will need an IELTS score (or equivalent English language qualification) of <strong>6.0 with a 6.0 in writing and no element lower than 5.5</strong> to study this programme. If you need assistance with your English language, we offer a range of courses that can help prepare you for degree-level study.</p> <h3>Selection process</h3> <p>We exercise flexibility where entry requirements are concerned, and make offers based on your enthusiasm and commitment to your subject, as shown by your application and personal statement, qualifications, experience and reference. If you don't have academic qualifications may be invited to interview.</p> <p>We frequently interview mature applicants (over 21) or those with alternative qualifications, and have a long tradition of encouraging students from all social backgrounds to study at our university.</p> <p> </p> <ul> <li>Home - full-time: £9250</li> <li>International - full-time: £16390</li> </ul> <p>If your fees are not listed here, please check our undergraduate fees guidance or contact the Fees Office, who can also advise you about how to pay your fees.</p> <p>It’s not currently possible for international students to study part-time if you require a Tier 4 student visa, however this is currently being reviewed and will be confirmed in the new year. Please read our visa guidance in the interim for more information. If you think you might be eligible to study part-time while being on another visa type, please contact our Admissions Team for more information.</p> <p>If you are looking to pay your fees please see our guide to making a payment.</p> <h3>Additional costs</h3> <p>In addition to your tuition fees, you'll be responsible for any additional costs associated with your course, such as buying stationery and paying for photocopying. You can find out more about what you need to budget for on our study costs page.</p> <p>There may also be specific additional costs associated with your programme. This can include things like paying for field trips or specialist materials for your assignments. Please check the programme specification for more information.</p> <h3>Funding opportunities</h3> <h2>Careers</h2> <ul> <li>an understanding of current and emerging social problems and theoretical approaches central to sociology</li> <li>the capacity to carry out preliminary sociological research</li> <li>the ability to examine how social, public and civic policy can be influenced by sociological knowledge</li> <li>the capacity to compose and analyse sociologically informed questions</li> <li>the ability to investigate, appraise and communicate empirical information</li> <li>research and problem-solving skills</li> <li>communication skills</li> </ul> <p>Throughout your degree you'll be encouraged to reflect on how the skills you are gaining can be useful to your future career. </p> <p>We work closely with the Goldsmiths Careers Service, part of the University of London Careers Service – the biggest in the UK. Through the Careers Service you'll have access to a wide range of facilities to help you plan your future effectively. You'll have the opportunity to meet our Department’s graduates and find out how their sociology degree gave them skills intrinsic to careers development.</p> <p>We also work closely with the College’s ’s Synapse programme, which provides workshops that will help you to develop both your employability and personal skills in critical and creative ways. In the context of a rapidly changing social and economic climate, these workshops provide you with valuable thinking time in which you can develop practical skills and also explore your ideas for your future.</p> <h3>Careers</h3> <p>Sociologists enter careers that centre on the challenges and demands that members of a society face. This could be jobs in social services, education, criminal justice, welfare services, government, the voluntary sector, management, the creative industries, marketing and policy.</p> <p>Over the last three years, some of the graduate level careers for Goldsmiths Sociology graduates have been:</p> <ul> <li>Events co-ordinator</li> </ul> <p> </p> <p>Students who achieve the best results during their undergraduate course may also get the chance to go on to postgraduate research for a higher degree with the aim of making a career in higher education either as a lecturer combining teaching with research or as a specialist researcher.</p> <p> </p> Tue, 02/18/2020 - 13:55 1430744 1430744 BA (Hons) Economics and Philosophy https://research-jobs.net/program/ba-hons-economics-and-philosophy-1430121 <p>Explore the ethical implications of financial decisions and train your mind as you question the fundamental principles that underpin society.</p> <p>Economic forces affect every aspect of our lives, from the price of coffee to our structures of our government. Study these pressures under the guidance of world-class researchers and analyse the philosophical implications of economic theory. Who bears the burden of financial stability? Can great wealth ever be ethical? Is it permissible to weigh the poverty of some against the greater happiness of the whole?</p> <p>You'll learn with a diverse and international student body and with opportunities to study abroad you can develop a truly global perspective. Our active Club of Politics, Economics and Philosophy (PEP) encourages debate beyond the classroom. The skills you will develop in thinking across boundaries and engaging critically with a range of material are highly valued by employers.</p> <blockquote> </blockquote> <h3>International reputation</h3> <p>As one of the first Schools to offer a Politics, Economics and Philosophy (PPE) degree, we have established a strong reputation around the world.</p> <h3>Flexibility</h3> <p>With degrees in PPE, Economics and Philosophy, Economics and Politics, and Philosophy and Politics you can choose the right degree to develop your strength across these interconnected disciplines.</p> <h2>Course content</h2> <p>You'll benefit from a solid grounding in the core subjects of Economics and Philosophy and build an understanding of the connections between these subjects through our interdisciplinary module <strong>Rationality, Morality and Economics</strong>. </p> <p>You'll choose from a large range of option modules that will help you tailor the course to your own interests, meaning you can develop your strengths in your second and third years.</p> <p>You also have the option of taking the Philosophy, Politics and Economics (PPE) dissertation - an extended piece of work in which you'll be able to apply the analytical skills you have developed across these disciplines. </p> <h3>Course transfer within PPE</h3> <p>It is reasonably easy to transfer between the courses in the School of PPE, subject to space being available on the course you want to move to. It is relatively easy to change within the first few weeks of the first year. After this, you may have to wait until the start of the second year, and at that point you can move only into a course for which you have taken the relevant first year introductory modules.</p> <h3>Study abroad</h3> <h3>Placement year</h3> <p>The university-wide placement scheme gives you the chance to work for a year as part of your degree to prepare you for the world of work. Previous placements have included GlaxoSmithKline, HSBC, British Airways, DAI and Lloyds Bank.</p> <p>Your first year will be split equally between Economics and Philosophy, taking 60 credits in each. </p> <p>The economics modules will provide you with modules focusing on the mathematical and statistical skills necessary for advanced study of the discipline. In philosophy you will take modules that introduce you to the methods of thinking and writing that underpin philosophy, central areas of philosophical study and key figures and works from the history of philosophy.</p> <p>Core modules</p> <p>In addition to the above you will also need to complete our online Academic Integrity module.</p> <p>This module covers some of the essential skills and knowledge which will help you to study independently and produce work of a high academic standard which is vital for success at York.</p> <p>This module will:</p> <ul> <li>explain why and when you should reference source material and other people's work</li> <li>provide interactive exercises to help you to assess whether you've understood the concepts</li> <li>provide answers to FAQs and links to useful resources.</li> </ul> <h3>Year 2</h3> <p>Core modules</p> <h3>Year 3</h3> <p>You'll take 120 credits in your final year - at least 20 credits in PPE and at least 40 credits each for Economics and Philosophy. Beyond this, you are free to choose modules from either discipline - or even elective modules from other departments.</p> <p>Dissertation</p> <p>You may choose the <strong>PPE dissertation</strong> (20 credits) as one of your option modules. This is supervised over all three terms and assessed in the Summer Term.</p> <p>Examples of previous dissertation titles include:</p> <ul> <li>A Feminist Critique of Drone Warfare</li> <li>A Politico-economic Analysis of the 2012-13 Financial Crisis in Cyprus</li> <li>Is it Wrong not to Vote? </li> </ul> <p>Core modules</p> <h3>Learning by design</h3> <p>Every course at York has been designed to provide clear and ambitious learning outcomes. These learning outcomes give you an understanding of what you will be able to do at the end of the course. We develop each course by designing modules that grow your abilities towards the learning outcomes and help you to explain what you can offer to employers. Find out more about our approach to teaching and learning.</p> <p>Students who complete this course will be able to:</p> <ul> <li>Draw upon the conceptual tools and methods of economics and philosophy, including the mathematical methods necessary to understand and apply economic theory, in order to analyse problems and issues that arise within their respective domains.</li> <li>Propose and evaluate creative solutions to complex problems by gathering and analysing a variety of information (where this includes statistical, mathematical, and interpretative data) and drawing upon the concepts, methods, and theories of the three disciplines.</li> <li>Communicate the issues, methods and results of the three disciplines in a clear and accessible way, demonstrating a sound understanding of the relevant disciplines and showing, where appropriate, how they can illuminate each other.</li> <li>Critically engage with, and, when necessary, synthesize academic and professional research in all three disciplines, thereby becoming a versatile and multi-skilled analyst.</li> <li>Appreciate and articulate the role of philosophical assumptions in different methodologies pursued in the social sciences.</li> <li>Use interdisciplinary thinking to reflect upon and engage with issues arising in modern societies, thereby acquiring a deeper understanding of the connections between the economics and philosophy by drawing on the complete set of skills developed in these disciplines.</li> <li>Locate, compile and present social, economic and financial data with an understanding of their strength and weaknesses and be able to use them in analysing and testing economic models.</li> </ul> <h2>Fees and funding</h2> <h3>Additional costs</h3> <p>There are no mandatory additional fees, but we do recommend that you set aside some money for photocopying. Course books will be available from the Library and online reading packs are available for most modules, but you may wish to buy your own copies. Each book typically costs £40.</p> <p>UK/EU or international fees? The level of fee that you will be asked to pay depends on whether you're classed as a UK, EU or international student.</p> <h3>Fees for subsequent years</h3> <ul> <li><strong>UK/EU</strong>: further increases within the government fee cap will apply in subsequent academic years. We will notify you of any increase as soon as we can.</li> <li><strong>International</strong>: fees for international students are subject to annual increases. Increases are currently capped at 2% per annum.</li> </ul> <h3>More information</h3> <p>For more information about tuition fees, any reduced fees for study abroad and work placement years, scholarships, tuition fee loans, maintenance loans and living costs see undergraduate fees and funding.</p> <h3>Funding</h3> <ul> <li>Academic Excellence scholarships: up to £15,000 for international students from outside the EU</li> </ul> <h3>Living costs</h3> <p>You can use our living costs guide to help plan your budget. It covers additional costs that are not included in your tuition fee such as expenses for accommodation and study materials.</p> <blockquote> <h2>“Students from all backgrounds achieve consistently outstanding outcomes”</h2> <p><cite>The TEF Panel, Office for Students, June 2018</cite></p> </blockquote> <p>Our Gold Teaching Excellence Framework award demonstrates our commitment to the delivery of consistently outstanding teaching and learning for our students.</p> <h2>Teaching and assessment</h2> <p>You’ll study and learn with academics who are active researchers, experts in their field and have a passion for their subjects. Our approach to teaching will provide you with the knowledge, opportunities, and support you need to grow and succeed in a global workplace. Find out more about our approach to teaching and learning.</p> <h3>Teaching format</h3> <p>We teach in two main ways: seminars and lectures. The main focus of your coursework will be conducted in seminar groups, normally of 10-15 students. In seminars you will produce and discuss your own work, under the guidance of a module tutor. Seminars are normally accompanied by lectures, attended by all of the students taking the module.</p> <p>In the first year, you will take introductory modules alongside students from a wide range of degree courses. In the second and third year modules, lectures are smaller - often with as few as 20 students.</p> <p>Timetabled activities Lectures</p> <table> <tbody> <tr> </tr> <tr> <td>0-2 hours per week</td> </tr> </tbody> </table> <p><small>These figures are based on an average student in an average week. Your contact hours will vary throughout the year due to your module choices, non-compulsory classes, exam periods and changes to scheduled activities.</small></p> <p>Outside your timetabled hours, you'll study independently. This may include preparation for classes, follow-up work, wider reading, practice completion of assessment tasks, or revision.</p> <p>In the UK, full-time students are expected to spend 1,200 hours a year learning. That's about 40 hours of classes and independent study each week during term time. Everyone learns at a different rate, so the number of hours you spend on independent study will be different to other students on your course.</p> <h3>Teaching location</h3> <p>The School of Philosophy, Politics and Economics is located in Derwent College, on Campus West. Teaching on this course takes place at various locations across Campus West including the Physics and Electronics Building and the newly opened Spring Lane Building.</p> <h3>About our campus</h3> <p>Our beautiful green campus offers a student-friendly setting in which to live and study, within easy reach of the action in the city centre. It's easy to get around campus - everything is within walking or pedalling distance, or you can always use the fast and frequent bus service.</p> <h3>Assessment and feedback</h3> <p>The majority of your assessments will be either unseen examination papers or essays, which will vary depending on the department running the module. Most Economics modules for example are assessed by exams, but in Philosophy there is more of a mixture of exams and essays.</p> <p>Assessments occur throughout the three years of study, usually in the term immediately after the module has been taken. There are three assessment periods during the academic year: Week 1 of the Spring Term, Week 1 of the Summer Term and Weeks 5 to 8 of the Summer Term.</p> <p>Percentage of the course typically assessed by coursework and exams Year 1</p> <table> <tbody> <tr> </tr> </tbody> </table> <h2>Careers and skills</h2> <p>The interdisciplinary nature of Economics and Philosophy provides transferable skills that are highly sought after by employers, with over 95% of our graduates entering further work or study within six months. With our diverse student body and opportunities for internships and study abroad, you'll be well prepared to enter the global marketplace.</p> <p>The Club of PEP also provides a platform for students to meet with experts and industry insiders through their careers branch, YorkWorks.</p> <h3>Career opportunities</h3> <ul> <li>Debating and clear expression of ideas</li> <li>Development and structuring of arguments</li> <li>Processing information</li> <li>Working and learning independently</li> </ul> <h2>Entry requirements</h2> <p>BTEC National Extended Diploma International Baccalaureate Other qualifications Other international qualifications</p> <table> <tbody> <tr> </tr> <tr> </tr> <tr> <td>We welcome applications from mature students (ie those aged over 21), and usually admit a number each year. In all cases we look for evidence of ability, interest and commitment, but we may not require specific formal qualifications. In most cases, we prefer to interview mature candidates before offering them a place.</td> </tr> <tr> </tr> </tbody> </table> <p>Criteria Widening participation Contextual offers EPQ</p> <table> <thead> <tr> </tr> </thead> <tbody> <tr> <td>If you successfully complete one of the following programmes, you may be eligible for an alternative offer up to one A level grade (or equivalent) below our typical offer: Next Step York, Realising Opportunities. More about widening participation.</td> </tr> <tr> <td>If you have experience of local authority care or live in an area with low progression to university, you may be eligible for an alternative offer up to two A level grades (or equivalent) below our typical offer. More about contextual offers.</td> </tr> <tr> <td>If you achieve A or higher at EPQ, you may be eligible for an alternative offer up to one A level grade (or equivalent) below our typical offer.</td> </tr> </tbody> </table> <h3>English language</h3> <p>If English isn't your first language you may need to provide evidence of your English language ability. We accept the following qualifications:</p> <p>Qualification PTE Academic GCSE/IGCSE/O level English Language (as a first or second language) TOEFL Trinity ISE III</p> <table> <thead> <tr> </tr> </thead> <tbody> <tr> </tr> <tr> <td>Grade C</td> </tr> <tr> <td>176, with a minimum of 169 each component</td> </tr> <tr> <td>87 overall, with a minimum of 21 in Listening, 21 in Reading, 21 in Speaking, 21 in Writing</td> </tr> <tr> </tr> </tbody> </table> <p>If you've not met our English language requirements</p> <p>You may be eligible for one of our pre-sessional English language courses. These courses will provide you with the level of English needed to meet the conditions of your offer.</p> <p>The length of course you need to take depends on your current IELTS scores and how much you need to improve to reach our English language requirements.</p> <p>After you've accepted your offer to study at York, we'll confirm which pre-sessional course you should apply to via You@York.</p> <h3>Applying</h3> <p>To apply to York, you will need to complete an online application via UCAS (the Universities and Colleges Admissions Service).</p> <ul> <li><strong>Dr Alex Hall</strong></li> </ul> <h3> </h3> Tue, 02/18/2020 - 13:53 1430121 1430121 BA (Hons) Film & Screen (TV & Digital Media) with Integrated Foundation https://research-jobs.net/program/ba-hons-film-screen-tv-digital-media-with-integrated-foundation-1430794 <p> </p> <ul> <li>Study: Full-time</li> <li>UCAS code: P312</li> </ul> <p>The modern media landscape is changing faster than any other industry.</p> <p>It is adapting to new methods of communication, new markets and new technology. Navigating this world requires practical skills, experience, and confidence.</p> <p>This programme will enable you to respond to changes in the 21st-century broadcast landscape. You will develop skills and technical expertise through hands-on activities, and also gain a thorough understanding of why they are important.</p> <p>You will gain traditional skills in directing, producing, sound, lighting, camera, editing and production management.</p> <p>You will explore a range of production and broadcast styles, allowing you to experience how techniques and approaches differ between feature films, short commercials, live news broadcasts, and more. You will also learn how to use digital media creatively to produce material and communicate ideas.</p> <p>An optional term spent studying abroad can, if you chose it, enable you to expand your learning outside the UK at a number of our partner institutions around the world.</p> <p>Your foundation year will provide you with a strong base of knowledge in many wider aspects of the Film & Screen landscape. Rather than purely focusing on the discipline of Screenwriting & Producing, it allows you to learn about film, performance, advertising, and more. This gives you a well-rounded knowledge of how the modern media industry works before you progress to Screenwriting & Producing modules at degree level.</p> <p>Key features include:</p> <ul> <li>Study abroad opportunities at leading institutions around the world</li> <li>Industry placement module that offers you the opportunity to gain first-hand experience of working in industry</li> <li>In your final year you get the opportunity to produce an individual project of your own.</li> </ul> <h2>Foundation Year</h2> <table> <tbody> <tr> <td>This module is a practical, hands-on introduction to the world of advertising and the art of promoting a product to a select market. The task embraces creativity alongside production skills. The task of writing a 30-second advertisement will introduce you to a vocational aspect of visual storytelling. A focus on identifying the market and presenting the finished work requires a breadth of skills including the ability to pitch to a variety of clients and potential financiers as well as an understanding of the increasing importance of internationalism in the world of advertising, appealing to as wide an audience as possible through all of the platforms available to advertisers.</td> </tr> <tr> <td>In this module, you will investigate storytelling in prose form. Effective storytelling has always been an essential aspect of communication between human beings and you will investigate what it is that makes good storytelling; the basics of cause-effect narrative, effective storytelling structure, characterisation and genre. You will analyse well known short stories and gain an understanding into what gives effective writing quality and depth. You will develop your own narrative skills and be introduced to the task of devising original ideas in the area of narrative fiction, working both individually and in groups. Skills will include deployment of narrative structure, plotting, relevant use of characterisation, use of arena and team working skills.</td> </tr> <tr> <td>The aims of this module are to develop an understanding of how and why design sound forms a basis in production technique, to create a short music video production and to understand and practice the roles therein. Key to this module will be an understanding of how to develop individual potential as well as learning about the necessity of effective team-working skills. You will learn to optimise the use and application of digital video cameras, sound playback systems and use editing software equipment.</td> </tr> <tr> <td>Following the increase in digital television channels and Internet streamed video content in recent years, the output of studio-based production has increased, with programmes as diverse as webcast soap operas/dramas, light entertainment chat shows and current affairs filling the schedules. The module will enable you to develop an understanding of the genres of programmes which are studio based and the phenomenon of format television. You will develop the skills to accomplish your own studio production from conception to delivery, concurrently developing the group working skills needed to work within a large production unit.</td> </tr> <tr> <td>Improvisation and theatre games provide a strong base for developing confidence and group skills for those considering working in the media. The TV and film industry requires people who can work effectively in both small and large groups, as well as having the ability to develop trust and work to deadlines. Learning how to access and enhance creativity within given parameters helps to engender these skills at foundation level as a basis for further study and future employment.</td> </tr> <tr> <td>This module is an introduction to basic skills in writing for the screen. You will learn script formatting and layout, together with a range of script terms and devices in common use. Alongside these core skills, essential to all writers for the screen in the film and television industries, you will begin the process of story generation and story adaptation through the development of two distinct pieces of work, a self-generated idea for the screen and an externally ‘commissioned’ idea for the screen.</td> </tr> </tbody> </table> <h2>Year 1 (Core Modules)</h2> <table> <tbody> <tr> <td>The module aims to provide you with an overview of modern creative business and will facilitate your appreciation of the variety of challenges facing individuals who opt to work in the international creative industries of the 21st century. You will learn to evaluate the effectiveness and impact of company structures, and of culture, finance, change management and strategy within business organisations, gaining an appreciation of your potential effectiveness as a manager of change in a range of creative disciplines.</td> </tr> <tr> <td>Television studio production remains at the core of the output for public and independent broadcasters. With the increase in digital television channels in recent years the output of studio productions has increased, with programmes as diverse as soap opera, light entertainment and news and current affairs filling the schedules. Students need to develop an understanding of the genres of programmes which are studio based and the phenomenon of format television. Students will also need to develop skills to accomplish their own studio production from conception to delivery, concurrently developing the group working skills needed to work within a large production unit. The study of studio based formats through lectures, tutorials and seminars will support and enable originality in the assessment of this unit.</td> </tr> <tr> <td>This module introduces a range of ideas and ways of thinking based around the University’s values, reflected in its learning outcomes. It encourages students to interact with the broader University community, both socially and academically, asking them to cross the physical and intellectual borders of their degree programmes. Global Perspectives aims to increase self-awareness and prepares students for their subsequent studies by familiarising them with the resources available to meet their lifelong learning needs.</td> </tr> <tr> <td>The aims of the module are to develop a sound basis in production technique, to create a short music video and a short reportage piece, and to understand and practice the roles therein. Key to this module will be an understanding of how you develops your potential as well as effective teamwork skills. The module will need to optimise the use and application of digital cameras, sound recording and editing equipment. You will need to learn how to develop and understand how different forms of filmmaking require different skills and approaches. In order to develop the skills of organisation and self-reflection you will need to effectively keep an online journal.</td> </tr> <tr> <td>The aim of this module is to provide you with the basic principles of screenwriting underpinned by Robert McKee in his seminal text ‘Story – Substance, Structure, Style and the Principles of Screenwriting’ through a series of seminars, workshops and tutorials on script craft and basic screenwriting practice. Where possible, we will also be offering subsidised entry to Robert McKee’s Story Seminar which is currently held at Regent’s University, London twice a year.</td> </tr> </tbody> </table> <h2>Year 1 (Elective Modules)</h2> <table> <tbody> <tr> <td>The aim of the module is to develop your understanding of the application of scriptwriting theory to a specialised form of narrative drama, and to provide you with a creative and critical foundation for making decisions about script when telling stories for the biographical short film. Further the module trains you in biographical research and material selection, and in the reduction of the biographical according to dramatic requirements.</td> </tr> <tr> <td>On completion of this module you will be able to plan, shoot and edit a short film, possess a broad understanding of the short film as a genre, and its constraints and potential. In addition you will be responsible for aspects of directing, performing, shooting and editing your group production, thus acquiring valuable co-operative skills for future writers, creatives and producers in an increasingly demanding industry. You will gain an understanding of the importance of mise-en-scène, location, sound, camera angle, blocking, movement and cutting in the visual adaptation of a script idea. Finally post-production and editing will explore the full potential of conceptualising and evaluating your completed project, and audience/market considerations.</td> </tr> <tr> <td>The aim of this module is to provide you with the cognitive and practical skills that will underpin much of your written and presentational work throughout your programme of study. It will develop your ability to study effectively and produce material that communicates an ability to think clearly and communicate with cogency in a range of formats – oral presentation, written work and visual communication. Initially a strong emphasis is placed on reading and research, critical thinking, referencing and the communication of understanding through the coherent expression of ideas.</td> </tr> <tr> <td>Television studio production remains at the core of the output for public and independent broadcasters. With the increase in digital television channels in recent years the output of studio productions has increased, with programmes as diverse as soap opera, light entertainment and news and current affairs filling the schedules. As a BA (Hons) Film & Screen student on the TV & Digital Media or Film Production pathway, you need to develop an understanding of the genres of programmes which are studio based and the phenomenon of format television. You will also need to develop skills to accomplish your own studio production from conception to delivery, concurrently developing the group working skills needed to work within a large production unit. The study of studio based formats through lectures, tutorials and seminars will support and enable originality in the assessment of this unit.</td> </tr> <tr> <td>There are a number of linguistic challenges when embarking upon study or research in English. This module is for students who would benefit from developing their knowledge and skills in the area of academic English alongside their disciplinary studies in their first semester. The main aims of this module are to develop the academic English language skills (listening, speaking, reading, and writing), language knowledge and study habits commensurate with first semester undergraduate level study. It will provide support to students’ performance in other modules and aid their integration into their new academic community. Their employability will also be enhanced through the development of relevant transferable skills. In addition, the module also reflects Regent’s deepened commitment to supporting their students.</td> </tr> <tr> <td>Non-native speakers of English face a number of linguistic challenges when embarking upon study or research in English. This module is for international students who want to develop their knowledge and skills in the area of academic English alongside their disciplinary studies. The main aims of this module are to develop the academic English language skills (listening, speaking, reading, and writing) and language knowledge commensurate with undergraduate level study. It will maximise and further enhance students’ performance in other modules and their employability through the development of transferable skills. In addition, the module also reflects Regent’s deepened commitment to internationalisation.</td> </tr> <tr> <td>A course for students who want to enhance their Business English language skills to boost employability. It will also support students in their performance in other modules. The course will introduce a variety of business-related topics and language and a studentled component will encourage engagement and interaction with peers. In addition, learners will explore a language learning puzzle throughout the module.</td> </tr> <tr> <td>This module is designed as an introduction to cross-cultural studies but also entails a significant component of self-reflection. The overall aim is to raise students’ awareness of the impact culture has on interpersonal and intergroup interaction. Emphasis will be placed on developing practical skills for effective communication in intercultural situations, e.g. working in multicultural teams. It is hoped the module can appeal across the varied programmes offered at Regent's, considering the diversity of the student body and the multicultural character of all the environments the students will be going into in their future careers. Examples and scenarios will be drawn from education, the business world, multicultural society and the students’ own experiences.</td> </tr> <tr> <td>This module aims to provide you with an understanding of the development of documentary, from its inception to modern day factual TV, examining the major themes that have shaped the genre around the world. Strong emphasis will be placed on the theoretical treatment of documentary including national movements and their historical and social contexts.</td> </tr> </tbody> </table> <h2>Year 2 (Core Modules)</h2> <table> <tbody> <tr> <td>This module will provide you with the technical and logistical skills required in Outside Broadcast and will also open up future career possibilities within OB Production. The aims are to develop the necessary practical skills required to create an Outside Broadcast event and to develop team working skills which you will employ within other modules and in their future careers. You will need to understand the principles and techniques of working within an outside broadcasting unit; specifying and rigging equipment, working with multiple cameras and multiple microphones in a live setting. Different types of OB will be taught, that can include sports, news, cultural/musical, nature, conference et cetera to give you the chance to develop an appropriate and original production in a niche area. You will also need to develop an understanding of the professional roles and responsibilities within OB production.</td> </tr> </tbody> </table> <h2>Year 2 (Elective Modules)</h2> <table> <tbody> <tr> <td>As the Study Abroad Semester is intended to introduce you to living and studying in a new environment, it is preferable if you do not opt for an institution in the same country as your nationality (e.g., US citizens are discouraged from applying for a US institution). You must be in good academic standing and have progressed to Year 2 (Level 5). You should ensure that you have sufficient funds to cover your time abroad and that your financial arrangements are in place prior to departure. You must fulfil the application, insurance and visa requirements required by your host institution. You must clear any financial obligations to Regent’s University and/or host institution prior to beginning your Year 3 (Level 6) study, as failure to do so may jeopardise progression to your final year of study.</td> </tr> <tr> <td>Placement learning is extremely valuable in relation to employability. We encourage all students to embark on internships and placements throughout their study at Regent’s but on this credit bearing module we ask you to reflect on your work placement(s) and to produce an academic piece of writing to support this reflection. The aim of a quality internship in the film and television industries is to develop your employability skills and increase graduate career prospects.c</td> </tr> <tr> <td>Truly great films are rarely realised. The perfect balance of the collective efforts of all the teams, departments and individuals (cinematographers, screenwriters, directors, producers, actors, sound designers and art directors etc.) that make up the cast and crew of a film is almost impossible to achieve. Feature length films are one of the costliest of art forms and thus, most of the time crews are working under time and financial pressure. There can be no one blueprint to making great cinema. Each endeavour is ‘a shot in the dark’, a gamble that the right balance of all the collective inputs of those involved can be achieved in realising a singular vision.</td> </tr> <tr> <td>The ability to develop and maintain a professional relationship when engaging with clients is an essential skillset for 21st century media producers. All clients – from the commercial to the subversive - now demand dialogue, sharing and feedback as equal partners in the creative process. Many organisations now engage at an online level and require high quality moving imagery to promote their agendas. Campaign film production is a module which harnesses the modern democratisation of digital film production and distribution methods, whilst encouraging you to engage in current social, political, economic, environmental and/or cultural issues in order to produce, shoot and edit a short campaign film which champions a cause, charity or organisation of your choice.</td> </tr> <tr> <td>The trade and circulation of television formats has grown incredibly over the past two decades. While the global industry of turnover from formats varies from nine to fifteen billion dollars a year, formatted shows form the backbone of TV broadcasting around the world. In the last decade the TV market, which was traditionally dominated by the UK, US and Netherlands, has opened up to new players. This change has triggered a revolution in the creation and marketing of formats, and has enabled creative individuals, who practiced only in their local markets, to have the opportunity to trade and flourish in an expanding global environment.</td> </tr> <tr> <td>This is a practical introduction to Directing for the Screen. You will work with actors to understand the process of developing a character and bringing that performance to the screen. Directing for the Screen will cover all of the key aspects of what is involved in being a director for film and television. You will cover a range of skills including breaking down scripts, casting, working closely with actors, understanding text, choreography and blocking scenes, improvisation, re-writing, storyboarding, camerawork, creating shot lists and editing.</td> </tr> <tr> <td>Through a series of lectures, seminars, as well as creation of a short experimental film and the Artist Manifesto, this module aims to demonstrate the value of experimentation in filmmaking. Drawing upon the various traditions of avant-garde film and contemporary trends in experimental moving image practices, you will be taught how to develop creative approaches to filmmaking that are informed by contextual and critical knowledge. Upon a successful completion of this module you will feel confident in engaging with different forms and styles of filmmaking, including personally, politically and socially engaged pieces.</td> </tr> <tr> <td>Script analysis also supports your own creative writing work. Structure, character, dialogue, genre, tone, setting and budget all come under the spotlight when analysing a screenplay and, by focusing on these practical issues in other writers’ work, the aspiring screenwriter will be able to transfer these skills to their own work and improve their own writing accordingly.</td> </tr> <tr> <td>With the development and expansion in digital television channels in recent years the volume of outside broadcast production has experienced a huge increase, and sports and music/concert coverage dominates the Outside Broadcast output of the digital channels. You need to develop an understanding of how to accomplish an outside broadcast, from conception to delivery, whilst developing the team skills needed to work within a large production unit. Locations around the campus will be set-up in order to both train ‘in house’ before moving to outside locations as well as to serve the wider University community for events taking place on campus.</td> </tr> <tr> <td>This module builds on the world of the evolving convergent digital technologies, which affect all elements of the media industry on a daily basis. It allows you to develop your digital skills, adapting to and exploiting the evolving digital landscape around you and expanding your understanding of how traditional entertainment and storytelling can cross platforms and traverse converging technologies. This module theorises alternative and traditional routes to market, brand extensions, commercial entertainment and distribution techniques. It will include presenting your theories and techniques, which, when put into practice, allow you the opportunity to extend entertainment ideas created with skills learned in Level Four modules, together with building an original cross-platform entertainment experience incorporating new media technologies.</td> </tr> <tr> <td>In this module we will look at writing audio-visual material for a wide age range of children from very young pre-schoolers up to those approaching their teens. You will identify your target audience and clearly pitch your material at the target age range. On completion of the module you will have a clear understanding of the challenges and possibilities afforded by developing material for a younger marketplace.</td> </tr> <tr> <td>A course for students who want to enhance their Business English language skills to boost employability. It will also support students in their performance in other modules. The course will introduce a variety of business-related topics and language and a studentled component will encourage engagement and interaction with peers. In addition, learners will explore a language learning puzzle throughout the module.</td> </tr> <tr> <td>A course for students who want to enhance their Business English language skills to boost employability. It will also support students in their performance in other modules. The course will introduce a variety of business-related topics and language and a studentled component will encourage engagement and interaction with peers. In addition, learners will explore a language learning puzzle throughout the module.</td> </tr> <tr> <td>The module is designed as a comprehensive platform for discussion of cross-cultural issues in a globalised world that demands an increasing need for effective intercultural contacts. The module looks at the necessity to raise intercultural competence among our culturally diverse students and to develop sensitivity to and a critical understanding of issues arising out of cultural difference, which will equip them with strategies to deal with cultural conflict. One of the distinctive features of the Regent’s learning experience is the multicultural environment and the international outlook of its programmes.</td> </tr> <tr> <td>This course will enable students, with or without prior knowledge of the subject, to develop an understanding of relevant themes of contemporary Latin America. By exploring and analysing a series of cultural aspects from a multidisciplinary perspective, students will gain an insight into the underlying issues and phenomena affecting the region.</td> </tr> <tr> <td>China is one of the world’s great civilizations with a rich cultural heritage providing the backdrop for a dynamic contemporary society. This module is designed to give students a contextualised introduction to the main areas and themes which have defined history, culture and society in China. By exploring and analysing a series of cultural aspects, the students will develop a critical perspective and gain an insight into the underlying multidisciplinary issues and phenomena affecting modern China. The aims of the module are to help students to understand contemporary Chinese society, culture, state, political structure and economic development; develop a knowledge of the role of traditional Chinese philosophical and religious beliefs in Chinese life; develop an appreciation of Chinese cultural and social values; be able to identify critical issues and analyse how elements of traditional culture, socialist ideology and economic reform construct the present culture in China.</td> </tr> <tr> <td>Adapting novels, plays, short stories, true stories, autobiographical stories, any narrative from its original form into a screenplay is a staple of the film and television industry. Compressing narratives, changing points of view, creating external dramatic storylines from interior monologues, simplifying stories, reducing characters, the list of potential pitfalls is as long and varied as the types of material available for adaptation.</td> </tr> </tbody> </table> <h2>Year 3</h2> <table> <tbody> <tr> <td>The work completed on this module will feed directly into the second term module Major Film Production – Post-Production & Marketing. You should complete the pre-production phase and principal photography of the major production on this module, with post-production of the major project completed in term two. The aims are to develop ideas and plans for the Major Film Production into useful pre-production materials. You will decide on a script/concept through residential workshops and meetings, individual and group tutorial discussion then begin development of that script/concept via a visual mood piece to provide evidence of references and thought around style and mise-en-scène. You will develop your specialist technical skills, specialist knowledge and organisational skills through workshops, which will build on previous years’ technical training. You will have developed a suitable level of specialist accomplishment in a specific production role. The assessment will include a script and pre-production materials in preparation for principle photography.</td> </tr> <tr> <td>The Post Production Module is the culmination of the practical, research and creative learning undertaken on the degree. It is also a showcase of your skills upon graduation. You will complete post-production and devise a strategy for marketing and distribution. At this stage of the year you should have completed principal cinematography on your major film project. This module seeks to support you in a professional approach to post-production providing opportunities for continual industry level feedback as well as skills training prior to submission of the major film project. Built on the Production Module in the first term, this module will offer a creative laboratory as well as specialist training in postproduction: editing, sound mixing/soundscape, colour grading and CGI/titles/credits.</td> </tr> <tr> <td>This module will provide you with an opportunity to engage with a research topic of your choosing and develop advanced skills in literature and resource searching. You will be expected to demonstrate autonomous learning and working to a given deadline. You will also be expected to critically evaluate an in-depth aspect of television, film or new media of your own choosing. In this module you will display this knowledge and research through a lecture and will display preparedness for the forthcoming essay via an abstract and bibliography.</td> </tr> <tr> <td>You will be expected to critically evaluate an in-depth aspect of television, film or new media of your own choosing, with extra recognition given to the study of an area outside of your own culture. There will be a necessity to locate, select and use critically information from a number of sources, including the use of IT based information sources and to complete and report on research conducted. Within the module you will have to communicate ideas accurately, persuasively and succinctly in writing.</td> </tr> </tbody> </table> <h3><strong>How to apply</strong></h3> <p>Applying to study at Regent's University London is quick and easy. We have put together some helpful information to guide you through the process. We accept direct applications and there is no application fee.</p> <p><strong>Not received your results yet?</strong></p> <p>That's fine, you can still apply even without your exam results. We can issue a <b>conditional offer</b> without your results. You just need be clear in your application which qualifications you are currently studying for.</p> <h2><strong>Application deadlines</strong></h2> <p> If you have not uploaded the relevant supporting documents during the online application process, you should ensure that we have the below supporting documents as soon as you have completed your application. These can be sent to the Regent’s Admissions Department via email to [email protected].</p> <ul> <li>Copies of academic transcripts and certificates from all previous studies (i.e. secondary school and/or university certificates)</li> <li>One academic letter of recommendation</li> <li>A 300-500 word personal statement outlining the reasons for applying to your chosen programme, how you feel you will benefit from the programme of study, what contributions you will make to the University and how this will help your future career aspirations.</li> <li>A copy of your passport photograph (ID) page</li> <li>If you are not a native English speaker, proof of your English proficiency</li> </ul> <p>Credit Transfer</p> <ul> <li>If you’ve already studied part of a degree course elsewhere, you may be able apply for Recognition of Prior Learning (RPL) and join the programme at an advanced entry point. If you’d like to request entry part-way through a programme, make sure you state this clearly in your statement of purpose and provide us with the transcripts and module descriptions for the relevant study.</li> </ul> <h3> <strong>Step 2: Receive a response to your application</strong></h3> <p>You can expect to receive a decision on your application within 10 working days of receipt of your completed application and supporting documents.</p> <p>We will assess whether you meet our entry requirements and will notify you of the decision via email. UCAS applicants will also receive official notification via the UCAS system.</p> <p>For some of our programmes, the selection process may include an interview or audition. Interviews/auditions can take the form of a one-to-one interview, group interview or portfolio review which may be conducted by telephone or as a Skype call. Arrangements of these are made between the Admissions Department and the applicant.</p> <h3><strong>Step 3: Accepting your offer</strong></h3> <p>If you wish to accept the offer you must pay the advance tuition fee deposit (non-refundable) to confirm your place.</p> <h3><strong>Step 4: After you have accepted your place</strong></h3> <p>Closer to the start of the term, the Admissions Team will send information regarding the registration process. This will include information on completing your online enrollment prior to your arrival as well as a checklist of documents you will need to bring with you to fully register onto the programme.</p> <h3><strong>Information for international students</strong></h3> <p>If you are an overseas student requiring visa sponsorship to study in the UK, our team will be in touch with information on applying for your student visa and the documents you will need. More information can be found on our visas and immigration page.</p> <h2>Scholarships and funding</h2> <h3>Undergraduate loans - Student Finance England 2019/20</h3> <p>Funding for UK, and EU nationals, as well as students with the status of Migrant Worker.</p> <h3>US Financial Aid</h3> <p>Direct subsidised and unsubsidised loans for US citizens, as well as Direct PLUS loans for eligible US citizens and Green Card holders administered by the US Department of Education (USED) for all eligible degree programmes offered at Regent’s University London.</p> <p>Degree level fee (starting September 2020): £18,000</p> <h3><strong>Non-refundable advance deposit</strong></h3> <h3><strong>What do fees include?</strong></h3> <p>Fees cover the cost of all tuition and access to the University’s IT infrastructure and library learning resources. Fees are presented for the first level of study which equates to two terms.</p> <h3><strong>What other costs should I budget for?</strong></h3> <p>You will need to budget additional funds for accommodation and living expenses, travel, and any additional trips, visits, activities or courses that you choose to participate in outside of the tuition offered as part of the programme.</p> <p>The library hold a limited number of copies of core text books and where possible in e-format. You will be encouraged to purchase your own text books and will need to budget approximately £80-£100 per year, depending on your programme of study.</p> <h3><strong>When are fees paid?</strong></h3> <ul> <li>An initial non-refundable advance deposit paid when you accept your offer of a place</li> <li>The advance deposit is allocated against the first term’s fees</li> <li>Tuition fees (including fees for subsequent terms) are due two weeks in advance of classes commencing</li> </ul> <h3><strong>Calculating fee increases</strong></h3> <ul> <li>The University sets tuition fees on an annual basis in line with the University's financial year which runs from 1 August to 31 July</li> <li>The fees quoted here are for one academic year of study</li> <li>For students starting their programme in January the programme spans two separate financial year accounting periods. Fees for the different teaching terms are calculated separately in line with fees charged in each financial year</li> <li>Fees for subsequent years of study are subject to fee inflation</li> <li>The University aims to keep annual fee increases in line with the University’s cost inflation. The expectation is that this will be no greater than UK consumer price inflation (CPI) plus 3%. There are occasionally variations to this dictated by the costs of running specific programmes or facilities required for our programmes</li> <li>As a registered charity, all fee increases are subject to approval of the Trustee Board thus ensuring that affordability for our students remains a primary concern in any decisions regarding fee increases</li> </ul> <p> </p> <h3><strong>Foundation year</strong></h3> <h3><strong>Year Three</strong></h3> <p>Self-Directed Study: 20</p> <h3><strong>Teaching staff</strong></h3> <p>You will be taught by experienced professionals from the media industry. Film, Media & Performance, Head of Programmes William Harris comes from a creative media background, having taught drama in the UK, Belgium, France, Italy, Spain, Lithuania, Poland, Estonia, Belarus and Russia. He holds an M.Phil in 20<sup>th</sup> Century French Actor Training from the University of Glasgow.</p> <p>Some of the lecturers on Film & Screen include:</p> <ul> <li>Tristan Tull </li> </ul> <ul> <li>Script analyses</li> </ul> <p>In your final year you will carry out an in-depth research project and present your research topic.</p> <p>Group assessments constitute 50% of your overall degree. These will take the form of short films, pitches and presentations, and written pitch documents.</p> <h3><strong>Study methods</strong></h3> <p>You will learn through lectures, seminars, workshops and tutorials, and will have the opportunity to specialise in preferred media areas through case studies.</p> <p>You will work on practical projects, both individually and in groups, replicating industry practice.</p> <h3><strong>Disability Support</strong></h3> <p>​We welcome and support students with a wide range of disabilities and health concerns. This includes learning difficulties, visual and hearing impairments, mental health difficulties, autism spectrum conditions, mobility difficulties, and temporary or chronic health conditions. </p> <p>Our dedicated Disability Officer is here to support you​. We ask that you speak with Student Registry and our Disability Officer as early as you can to enable us to support you. Find out more about <u>our disability support</u> and <u>contact us</u>. </p> <p> </p> <h3>Academic Requirements </h3> <p>A Regent’s education provides you with a high level of personal attention, and this begins from the moment you apply to study with us. We want to understand who you are and what your skills and interests may be – we are interested in your potential, as well as your prior achievements. We review each application comprehensively and on its individual merit, considering all of your skills, interests and attributes.</p> <p>Typically, we will make an offer to a student holding at least 5 GCSEs at grades A-C / 9-4 or international equivalent including Mathematics. Regent’s receives applications from over 170 countries and assesses all international qualifications, for example, we would make an offer of minimum 2.5 GPA for the American High School Diploma.</p> <h3>English Requirements </h3> <ul> <li>IELTS: Overall score of 5.5, with a minimum of 5.5 in each individual component</li> <li>GCSE/IGCSE English, grade C / 4 (for IGCSE certificates, please provide the Supplementary Certifying Statement with the breakdown of component grades).</li> </ul> <p>This list is not exhaustive, we will review the English qualifications you have as part of your application and be in contact if we require anything further.</p> <p>For applicants who wish to improve their English language proficiency, please see our English language courses.</p> <h3>Regent's English Password Test (REPT)</h3> <p>For offer holders able to visit us in London, we can provide an on-campus English diagnostic test known as the Regent’s English Password Test (REPT). This test must be arranged in advance. To find out more information and to book a test, please visit the REPT page. Please note, the REPT test will be free of charge until 31 May 2020. From 1 June 2020, there will be a £50 charge to take the REPT test.</p> <p>This degree is designed for students looking for a career in broadcast media, in roles such as:</p> <ul> <li>Cinematographer</li> <li>Digital Developer</li> </ul> <p>Whether you’re looking to make your mark in a small, independent company or a large organisation like the BBC, this degree provides the training to do so.</p> <h2> </h2> Tue, 02/18/2020 - 13:47 1430794 1430794 BEng (Hons) Electronic Engineering with Music Technology Systems https://research-jobs.net/program/beng-hons-electronic-engineering-with-music-technology-systems-1429073 <p>Gain the practical experience, scientific knowledge and engineering skills you'll need to launch your career in music technology or audio engineering.</p> <p>With access to the latest computer design labs, multi-speaker surround sound systems, multimedia studios and an anechoic chamber you’ll be able to explore synthesiser technology, MIDI, audio recording, sampling and digital audio signal processing. You’ll not just learn how this technology is applied in making and recording music, but also use your engineering expertise to design and build the next generation of audio technology.</p> <p>With individual and group projects at every stage of the degree designed to develop practical, organisational, management and business skills, you'll graduate with the knowledge and skills you’ll need to operate with confidence – as an audio engineer, expert designer, researcher or engineering manager in the exciting field of audio and music technology.</p> <p>This course is identical to our BEng Music Technology Systems. You can choose which title you graduate with, based on your own career interests.</p> <h3>Accreditation</h3> <p>This course is fully accredited by the IET and counts towards the training requirements for Chartered Engineer (CEng) status.  Our courses have been continually accredited for 25 years.</p> <blockquote><cite>Crispin, BEng Electronic Engineering with Music Technology Systems</cite></blockquote> <p><small>(National Student Survey 2019)</small></p> <h2>Course content</h2> <p>Our modules are geared to meet the rigorous needs of the electronics industry. You'll study the principles and practicalities of electronic engineering, as well as honing essential skills in mathematics and computer programming.</p> <p>As you progress, you'll cover topics such as electronic hardware design, Java programming, signal processing and analysis, microprocessor interfacing, engineering construction and design, feedback and computer control. In your final year you'll specialise further in music technology, but also have the option other modules to further your knowledge in other areas of electronics.</p> <p>Throughout your course you'll have opportunities to apply your learning in our well-equipped labs. Individual and group projects will see you design, build and test products using state-of-the art hardware, software and fabrication facilities.</p> <h3>Study abroad</h3> <h3>Year 1</h3> <p>Year 1 provides you with a grounding in electronic principles, circuits, components, devices and recording studio techniques. There's a strong emphasis on mathematics and computing, including learning the C and Python programming languages. You'll also develop your practical skills, designing and building complete audio products as part of laboratories and group projects.</p> <p><strong>Core modules</strong></p> <p>In addition to the above you will also need to complete our online Academic Integrity module.</p> <p>This module covers some of the essential skills and knowledge which will help you to study independently and produce work of a high academic standard which is vital for success at York.</p> <p>This module will:</p> <ul> <li>explain why and when you should reference source material and other people's work</li> <li>provide interactive exercises to help you to assess whether you've understood the concepts</li> <li>provide answers to FAQs and links to useful resources.</li> </ul> <h3>Year 2</h3> <p>In Year 2 you'll learn to analyse and design hardware and software systems. You'll study material including acoustics, data structures, algorithms, electromagnetism and Java programming. An advanced construction project gives you the opportunity to apply your skills of design, engineering, problem-solving and project-management.</p> <p><strong>Core modules</strong></p> <h3>Year 3</h3> <p>In Year 3 you'll study a range of advanced core and option modules. You can focus on your interests, or investigate a new aspect of electronic engineering. Throughout the year you'll work on a major individual project, using the knowledge and skills you've developed to research and design a solution to an engineering challenge.</p> <p><strong>Core modules</strong></p> <ul> <li><em>Radio controlled ultra small airplane</em></li> <li><em>Programmable environmental chamber</em></li> <li><em>Magnetic biosensors for future medicine</em></li> <li><em>Visual tuning feedback for choirs</em></li> <li><em>An electronic Alethiometer</em></li> </ul> <p>Many of the projects on offer are closely aligned to our current research, giving you the chance to work alongside world-class academics at the forefront of the field.</p> <p>Option modules</p> <h3>Learning by design</h3> <p>Every course at York has been designed to provide clear and ambitious learning outcomes. These learning outcomes give you an understanding of what you will be able to do at the end of the course. We develop each course by designing modules that grow your abilities towards the learning outcomes and help you to explain what you can offer to employers. Find out more about our approach to teaching and learning.</p> <p>Students who complete this course will be able to:</p> <ul> <li>Assess electronic engineering designs by applying detailed knowledge of algorithms, devices and systems and by consulting relevant documentation and research. </li> <li>Evaluate system and component performance through a variety of analytical techniques including computational methods and modelling. </li> <li>Create designs to address real-world problems by synthesising ideas into engineering specifications. </li> <li>Solve technical problems through employing skills in programming, CAD, construction and measurement and by using safe laboratory techniques. </li> <li>Clearly communicate and explain electronic engineering issues and practice in a technically accurate manner to a variety of audiences, verbally, in writing and using multimedia. </li> <li>Coordinate and execute complex projects (with effective time management, team working, and ethical decision-making) in preparation for technical careers in electronics, computing and related disciplines.</li> </ul> <h3>Strong links with industry</h3> <p>We will help you to become an employment-ready, motivated graduate, with skills in the latest developments in engineering such as robotics, artificial intelligence, virtual reality and immersive technology.</p> <h3>Creative and innovative projects</h3> <p>Develop essential management, coordination and decision-making skills with a software engineering team project. Your final year project gives you the scope for ambitious research in an area that interests you.</p> <h3>Free membership</h3> <p>We offer all students free membership of ShockSoc (our student electronics society), SWEY (Supporting Women in Engineering, York) and we pay for student membership of the Institute of Engineering and Technology (IET) while you are at York.</p> <h2>Fees and funding</h2> <h3>Additional costs</h3> <p>There is no compulsory purchase of equipment or books necessary for this course. Lecture notes will be provided by staff, and you will have free printing.</p> <p>UK/EU or international fees? The level of fee that you will be asked to pay depends on whether you're classed as a UK, EU or international student.</p> <h3>Fees for subsequent years</h3> <ul> <li><strong>UK/EU</strong>: further increases within the government fee cap will apply in subsequent academic years. We will notify you of any increase as soon as we can.</li> <li><strong>International</strong>: fees for international students are subject to annual increases. Increases are currently capped at 2% per annum.</li> </ul> <h3>More information</h3> <p>For more information about tuition fees, any reduced fees for study abroad and work placement years, scholarships, tuition fee loans, maintenance loans and living costs see undergraduate fees and funding.</p> <h3>Funding</h3> <ul> <li>Academic Excellence scholarships: up to £15,000 for international students from outside the EU</li> </ul> <p>We have a number of departmental scholarships open to all Year 1 students starting in 2020.</p> <p>You'll be automatically considered for a scholarship if York is your firm choice. They will be awarded based on your whole application, with emphasis on the highest grades of entry.</p> <p>£500 is paid during Autumn Term and the other £500 is paid at the end of Summer Term, providing you successfully progress to Year 2.</p> <h3>Living costs</h3> <p>You can use our living costs guide to help plan your budget. It covers additional costs that are not included in your tuition fee such as expenses for accommodation and study materials.</p> <blockquote> <h2>“Students from all backgrounds achieve consistently outstanding outcomes”</h2> <p><cite>The TEF Panel, Office for Students, June 2018</cite></p> </blockquote> <p>Our Gold Teaching Excellence Framework award demonstrates our commitment to the delivery of consistently outstanding teaching and learning for our students.</p> <h2>Teaching and assessment</h2> <p>You’ll study and learn with academics who are active researchers, experts in their field and have a passion for their subjects. Our approach to teaching will provide you with the knowledge, opportunities, and support you need to grow and succeed in a global workplace. Find out more about our approach to teaching and learning.</p> <h3>Teaching format</h3> <ul> <li>Lectures</li> <li>Workshops</li> <li>Supervisions</li> </ul> <p>You'll also be expected to spend time studying independently. As you progress through the course you'll take on more independent study, guiding your own learning and developing your project management skills.</p> <p>Your individual project in your final year will be supervised by an academic member of staff who will guide you through your project.</p> <p>Timetabled activities Lectures</p> <table> <tbody> <tr> </tr> <tr> <td>0-2 hours per week</td> </tr> </tbody> </table> <p><small>These figures are based on an average student in an average week. Your contact hours will vary throughout the year due to your module choices, non-compulsory classes, exam periods and changes to scheduled activities.</small></p> <p>Outside your timetabled hours, you'll study independently. This may include preparation for classes, follow-up work, wider reading, practice completion of assessment tasks, or revision.</p> <p>In the UK, full-time students are expected to spend 1,200 hours a year learning. That's about 40 hours of classes and independent study each week during term time. Everyone learns at a different rate, so the number of hours you spend on independent study will be different to other students on your course.</p> <h3>Facilities</h3> <p>You can find detailed descriptions of our facilities on our website, including laboratory space, recording studios, clean room and computing classrooms.</p> <h3>Teaching location</h3> <p>You will be based in the Department of Electronic Engineering, on Campus West.</p> <p>Most of your contact hours will be in the Department of Electronic Engineering, with some additional teaching on Campus West.</p> <h3>About our campus</h3> <p>Our beautiful green campus offers a student-friendly setting in which to live and study, within easy reach of the action in the city centre. It's easy to get around campus - everything is within walking or pedalling distance, or you can always use the fast and frequent bus service.</p> <h3>Assessment and feedback</h3> <p>Your assignments will be designed not just to test you but for you to creatively apply what you've learnt, and to stretch you to supply novel solutions. We use a variety of assessment styles, including exams, coursework and practical engineering tasks. You'll encounter all of them during your course, but the exact balance will depend on the modules you choose:</p> <ul> <li>Closed-book exams</li> <li>Presentations and demonstrations</li> <li>Major technical reports</li> </ul> <p>You'll receive written feedback on work you hand in to help you understand your grade and develop your skills. For your individual project you'll produce a written report, have a viva (a presentation and question/answer session) and also show your project on our demo day, which our external advisory board attend.</p> <p>There are two progression points during the foundation year: one at the end of Term 1 and another at the end of the academic year. Foundation Year students complete coursework assessments and take exams in Maths and Physics in December (last week of Term 1) which must be successfully passed in order to progress to the Spring term (Term 2). At the end of Summer Term (Term 3) progression on to one of our BEng courses depends on successful completion of the Foundation year including coursework assessments and exams. If you would like further information about this, please get in touch.</p> <p>Percentage of the course typically assessed by coursework and exams Year 1</p> <table> <tbody> <tr> </tr> </tbody> </table> <h3>Committed to equality</h3> <h3>Flexible courses</h3> <p>You may be able to change course, add a year in industry or change between MEng and BEng. Just ask us for more details.</p> <h2>Careers and skills</h2> <p>The growth of the electronics industry means demand for new engineers is always high. We have the highest proportion of graduates finding employment within one year of finishing their studies (UK engineering and technology graduates LEO data set, June 2017). Our students enter a wide range of jobs, not just in electronic engineering, but in a variety of related fields such as software programming and hardware development</p> <p>For those wishing to take different career paths, the transferable skills you'll develop are highly valuable. Mathematics, programming, team working and technical management are sought after in a huge range of sectors, from media to financial services. Recent employers have included Jaguar Land Rover, IBM, Qinetiq, ARM, BBC, BT and Network Rail. Find out more about our graduate destinations and graduate profiles.</p> <h3>Career opportunities</h3> <ul> <li>Create designs to address real-world problems by synthesising ideas in engineering specifications</li> <li>Solve technical problems through applying skills in programming, CAD, construction and measurement</li> <li>Communicate and explain electronic engineering issues to a variety of audiences verbally, in writing, and using multimedia</li> <li>Assess designs by applying detailed knowledge algorithms, devices and systems, and consulting relevant research</li> <li>Coordinate and execute complex projects in electronics</li> <li>Effective time management, teamworking and ethical decision making</li> </ul> <h2>Entry requirements</h2> <p>A levels BTEC National Extended Diploma International Baccalaureate Other qualifications Other international qualifications</p> <table> <tbody> <tr> </tr> <tr> <td>Pass with Distinction in Higher National Certificate or Higher National Diploma in Electronic and Electrical Engineering or a related subject. BTEC National Extended Diploma in Engineering with an overall grade of DDM and A level Maths grade B All applicants need Distinction in Further Maths for Technicians and Distinction in Further Electrical/Electronic Principles. We do consider applications from people offering combinations of A levels and BTECs subsidiary diplomas; contact us for more advice. Students taking BTEC National Extended Diploma in Engineering but not doing A level Maths will be considered for our degree with Foundation year, but the final decision on which course is most appropriate will be made at interview. BTEC Extended Diplomas in ICT, Music Technology or Applied Science are not suitable for entry into the first year of our courses. However we do welcome applicants with those qualifications for our courses that include a foundation year, see other qualifications below.</td> </tr> <tr> </tr> <tr> <td>If your qualifications are not suitable for direct entry to one of our degree courses but you think you have the potential to succeed, see our BEng Music Technology Systems with a Foundation Year.</td> </tr> <tr> </tr> </tbody> </table> <h3>Additional requirements</h3> <p>For our Music Technology courses, you should be able to demonstrate a motivation towards making or recording music. You can tell us about your musical interests in your UCAS personal statement. If you are based in the UK and are invited to interview, we will discuss your musical interests and motivation as part of the interview process.</p> <p>Some examples of how you could demonstrate this would be:</p> <ul> <li>That you play an instrument or sing. This could be through formal music qualifications or as a hobby, for example as part of a band, choir or orchestra</li> <li>That you are involved in making music with technology eg you record/mix music or have experience of live sound for events such as theatre or church services.</li> </ul> <h3>Alternative offers</h3> <p>Criteria Widening participation Contextual offers EPQ</p> <table> <thead> <tr> </tr> </thead> <tbody> <tr> <td>If you successfully complete one of the following programmes, you may be eligible for an alternative offer up to one A level grade (or equivalent) below our typical offer: Next Step York, Realising Opportunities. More about widening participation.</td> </tr> <tr> <td>If you have experience of local authority care or live in an area with low progression to university, you may be eligible for an alternative offer up to two A level grades (or equivalent) below our typical offer. More about contextual offers.</td> </tr> <tr> <td>If you achieve C or higher at EPQ, you may be eligible for an alternative offer up to one A level grade (or equivalent) below our typical offer.</td> </tr> </tbody> </table> <h3>English language</h3> <p>If English isn't your first language you may need to provide evidence of your English language ability. We accept the following qualifications:</p> <p>Qualification PTE Academic GCSE/IGCSE/O level English Language (as a first or second language) TOEFL Trinity ISE III</p> <table> <thead> <tr> </tr> </thead> <tbody> <tr> </tr> <tr> <td>Grade C</td> </tr> <tr> <td>169, with a minimum of 162 each component</td> </tr> <tr> <td>79 overall, with a minimum of 17 in Listening, 18 in Reading, 20 in Speaking, 17 in Writing</td> </tr> <tr> </tr> </tbody> </table> <p>If you've not met our English language requirements</p> <p>You may be eligible for one of our pre-sessional English language courses. These courses will provide you with the level of English needed to meet the conditions of your offer.</p> <p>The length of course you need to take depends on your current IELTS scores and how much you need to improve to reach our English language requirements.</p> <p>After you've accepted your offer to study at York, we'll confirm which pre-sessional course you should apply to via You@York.</p> <h3>Applying</h3> <p>To apply to York, you will need to complete an online application via UCAS (the Universities and Colleges Admissions Service).</p> <ul> <li><strong>Admissions Enquiries - Helen Lay</strong></li> </ul> <h3> </h3> Tue, 02/18/2020 - 13:42 1429073 1429073 BSc in Business Administration and Digital Management https://research-jobs.net/program/bsc-in-business-administration-and-digital-management-1430547 <ul> <li>How much economics or languages a programme contains</li> <li>How many men and women there are</li> <li>How old the students are</li> <li>Much more</li> </ul> <p><strong>BSc in Business Administration and Digital Management</strong></p> <p>BSc in Business Administration and Digital Management gives you an understanding of the possibilities as well as challenges that digitalisation creates for companies. You will learn to work with strategy, data and technologies to manage digital transformations and business solutions.</p> <p><strong>Doing business in a digital age</strong>Digital innovation, new technologies and advanced ways of working with data shape and change virtually all aspects of how companies and other organisations do business. Digital information, including “big data”, creates new ways for companies to develop their activities and strategies. Social media and new communication platforms require companies to find new ways of managing communication internally as well as their relations with partners and customers. Planning, development, administration, and production are increasingly optimised through digital systems. In addition, organisations and the people who work within them must adapt to new ways of working, thinking and managing.<strong>Understanding digital strategies as part of business strategies</strong>To manage this digital complexity businesses need specialists who not only understand digital innovation, data and technologies, but also the strategic goals organisations set and the business conditions and market challenges they face. This expertise is what BSc DM aims to help you develop. It does not focus on technology as such, but rather on the interactions and interrelations between technology, data, business and society. It is not so much about understanding specific IT systems or solutions as understanding how digital transformations and data-driven approaches open new ways of working and at the same time pose new challenges.Traditionally, digital technologies are seen as “add-ons”. BSc DM instead sees digital transformations as something a modern company must integrate as part of everything it does. In particular, future managers and leaders will need to take responsibility for digital developments, rather than rely on consultants or their IT department.</p> <p>A digital approach or plan is not something you add to an existing business model or plan – the two should go hand in hand through the whole development process. Or to put it simply: Today, a professional business mindset also needs to be a digital mindset.<strong>A highly integrated approach to working with digitalisation</strong>BSc DM comprises three main areas of study: business admini­stration, digital technologies and data, and sociological and organisational perspectives. Most of the courses combine and integrate elements from two or all three areas – and in some way, perspectives on digitalisation will be part of every single course.In these integrated courses, you will work with traditional business topics such as finance, accounting, statistics, innovation, strategy and organisation. You will learn how to make sense of complex data, work with data analysis – how you collect, organise and gain insights – and how to create valuable know­ledge as a foundation for making qualified business decisions. You will also work with the many different options that are available to companies, and get an understanding of challenging and critical issues, such as data protection, privacy, ethics and responsibility. In addition, you will work with understanding digital transformations not only from the perspective of the individual company but also in terms of how they impact on a societal and global level.Understanding these topics – and especially how they relate to and affect each other – will make you master a range of analytical methods that enable you to understand complexities, work in a structured fashion and develop effective digital business solutions.</p> <p><strong>Hear it from the students</strong>Click below and hear why Sophie, Philip and other students chose BSc DM and get their advise in regards to studying at CBS:</p> <p>What you should be interested in if you choose BSc DMIn order to study BSc DM successfully and be happy with the programme it would be useful to be interested in:</p> <ul> <li>digitalisation and how technology affects people and organisations.</li> <li>how technology is developing.</li> <li>how companies adapt to change.</li> <li>working in an analytical way. Figuring out which questions are important for a company to ask in a given situation – and figuring out how to arrive at the answers to those questions</li> <li>the world around you in general and social and cultural trends affected by technology and digitalisation in particular </li> </ul> <p>Challenges in BSc DM</p> <p>Many of the challenges of studying at university are the same for all programmes.</p> <p>Each study programme also has some particular challenges that are important to think about before you choose the programme. How well do these challenges correspond to the sort of person you are, how you like to work and the things you are good at?</p> <p><strong>Working analytically</strong>For many students the biggest challenge of BSc DM will be learning to work in a very analytical way where the discussion of how you can best arrive at results is just as important as the results themselves. This is something that you need to be comfortable with.</p> <p><strong>Interdisciplinary courses</strong>All of the courses are highly interdisciplinary and integrated. This can be challenging because it means that you need to think in a complex way where you juggle business and technology topics at the same time. </p> <p>Also, it means that it takes time before you fully understand how the different courses and topics relate to one another. Often it will not be until the second or third year that everything comes together in your head and you get a clear picture of all the aspects of the programme’s scope.</p> <p><strong>Maths as a tool</strong>In about a third of the mandatory courses in BSc DM you will use maths as a tool. You will not use maths that is complicated beyond the entry requirement for the programme, but you need to be comfortable having courses where you use maths and do calculations at a practical level.</p> <p>What BSc DM can give youThe programme will give you:</p> <ul> <li>an understanding of business combined in combination with digital technologies, strategies and business applications</li> <li>analytical tools for developing cutting edge digital business solutions</li> </ul> <p>You can find more information about what you learn in the programme in the</p> <p><strong>Master’s programmes and career options</strong></p> <p>The clear majority of students from BSc DM are expected to continue on a two-years master’s programme for a total of five years of study. It is very much the master’s rather than the bachelor programme that determines which career paths that lay open to you.</p> <p>Admission</p> <table> <tbody> <tr> <td> <p>60% / 40%</p> </td> </tr> </tbody> </table> <h2>Oversigt over uddannelsen</h2> <h3>Managing Innovation in Organizations</h3> <p>The purpose of the course is to introduce students to the foundations of innovation theory, located at the intersection of technology, organization and marketing issues. Building on this foundation, the course will also address the ‘future’ of innovation theory and practice, specifically exploring the role of new technologies in enabling new forms of innovation organizing.</p> <p> </p> <p>Through the course, we will progress from basic understandings of the societal role of innovation via questions of innovation strategy to the micro-level dynamics of how innovation both shapes and is shaped by organizations. The course aims to provide a repertoire of concepts and theoretical understandings allowing the student to conceptualize innovation-related issues and to reflect on these in a theoretically informed manner. Ideas covered are drawn from economic history, organization theory, innovation economics and marketing theory and include:</p> <ul> <li>Creative Destruction</li> <li>Different forms of innovation, including disruptive innovation, foundational technologies and architectural innovation</li> <li>Different forms of ambidexterity</li> <li>First-mover advantage and disadvantage</li> </ul> <p> </p> <p>The course also aims to strengthen the students’ ability to express these ideas in oral and especially written form, and trains the ability to engage with ideas expressed in various scholarly and applied forms. This will be done through dedicated lessons on writing technique and practice,</p> <p>in-class and take-home exercises as well as through conversations with guest speakers and engagement in games.</p> <h3>Learning Objectives</h3> <ul> <li>Identify issues related to the management of innovation and technology in organizations</li> <li>Select relevant theory (within, but necessarily limited to, the course curriculum) to conceptualize, analyze and discuss practical issues, arguments and perspectives on innovation and technology in theoretically informed ways</li> <li>Reflect on the opportunities and challenges posed by innovation and technologies to organizations and society</li> <li>Do the above in correct, clear, concise and coherent written form</li> </ul> <h3>ECTS</h3> <h3>Economics in the Digital Age</h3> <table> <tbody> <tr> <td> <p>The course introduces the main microeconomic theories and provides students with the analytical tools and capabilities which will allow them to critically examine digitalization and digital transformation at the consumer, firm, and industry level. The course will apply and discuss microeconomic theories and how they can help to analyse, understand, and solve business problems. By applying these theories, we can develop recommendations for decision and strategy making. This course will emphasize the importance of economic theories in the context of digital transformation. This will provide students with a fundamental understanding of how to approach business problems related to digitalization.</p> </td> </tr> </tbody> </table> <h3>Learning Objectives</h3> <p>1. Have a fundamental understanding of theories in microeconomics. 2. Be able to apply microeconomic theories to analyse, understand, and solve real-life business problems in a structured manner. 3. Be able to identify and develop recommendations for decision and strategy making based on microeconomic theories. 4. Be able to use microeconomic theories to critically discuss the role of digital transformation for consumers, firms, and industries.</p> <h3>ECTS</h3> <ul> <li>Accounting as a form of communication</li> <li>Financial statements and Annual Reports</li> <li>Double-entry bookkeeping</li> <li>Inventories and Cost of Goods Sold</li> <li>Cash, receivables and short term investments</li> <li>Fixed Assets (Tangible & Intangible)</li> <li>Shareholders’ Equity</li> </ul> <ul> <li>Apply the accounting equation and double entry-accounting</li> <li>Explain the difference between cash and accrual accounting</li> <li>Prepare financial statements based on accounting transactions</li> <li>Calculate financial ratios and analyze the information content of these measures</li> <li>Explain the role of the digitalization for financial reporting</li> <li>Understand the role of ethics in preparing and using accounting information</li> </ul> <h3>ECTS</h3> <h3>Information Management in Organizations</h3> <p>With the rise of the internet and digital media, practices of managing information in organizations are in a stage of transition away from the conventional paradigm of retrieving information stored in silos towards a new paradigm based on digital networking and information construction. The course embarks upon a journey to trace this transition by, first, discussing the intricacies of conventional practices (e.g. knowledge repositories, taxonomies) and the changes these practices are going through due to digitalization. It is against this backdrop that the course will then continue to discuss new practices of information management (e.g. wikis, prediction markets) as well as the implications of these practices on economic ventures, organized collaboration and many other domains of social interaction. In order to learn how to apply these practices in real-life contexts, the students will have to work with a real organization of their choosing, identify a real problem in that organization, and design a solution in the form of a business case.</p> <h3>Learning Objectives</h3> <ul> <li>Contrast conventional and digital practices of information management</li> <li>Resolve real-life organizational problems of information management</li> <li>Apply theoretical concepts and design principles of information management to real-life cases</li> <li>Evaluate and critically reflect on the organizational and ethical implications of information management in the digital economy</li> </ul> <h3>ECTS</h3> <h3>Electives / Exchange / Academic internship (30 ECTS)</h3> <p>In the 5th semester, you can take electives at CBS or other universities, go on exchange or do an internship in a company.</p> <h3>Research Methods</h3> <p><strong>Course description</strong></p> <p>The aims of this course are to provide students with a general training in research methods and techniques, including research design, the collection, analysis and interpretation of data, and to enable students to evaluate critically their own research and that of professional researchers. </p> <p> </p> <p>Methodological challenges in the field of social digital transformations typically relate to algorithmic processes, data analysis, and social analysis and interpretation. It is therefore relevant to critically discuss and evaluate common approaches and methodologies in the programme's three main areas of study: 1) business administration, 2) digital technologies and data, and 3) sociological and organisational perspectives.</p> <p> </p> <p>Emerging digital research methods both give rise to and help us explore new digital objects such as networks, databases, platforms, data visualizations, maps and many other social, cultural and political phenomena. This module offers insights into these new and emerging methodologies, what phenomena they can address as well as helps frame these methods as co-constitutive of said phenomena. The course thus provides an introduction to basic questions of methodology in digital human and social science research and how they are related to epistemological and ontological issues in the history and philosophy of science. </p> <p> </p> <p><strong>The course has two components:</strong></p> <p><em>i. Principles of Research in organization and communication</em>: a series of lectures offered by course coordinator and invited guest lecturers. The lectures will normally cover the following topics central to research design across the social sciences, with a specific emphasis on their application to business administration, digital technologies and organizational contexts: the general nature of research as social inquiry, interviewing, critical discourse analysis, social network analysis, content analysis, visual analysis, survey design/questionnaires, case studies, ethnography and participant observation and research ethics.</p> <p><em>ii. Principles of Social Research</em><strong>:</strong> a series of four workshops offered by course coordinator with invited guest lecturers. Students are required to participate in three of the workshops.</p> <p> </p> <p><strong>Themes of the course include: </strong></p> <ul> <li>Digital methods, big data analysis and embedded assumptions; how tools and devices participate in shaping the world with us as we use them.</li> <li>Basic positions in the philosophy of social science, science and technology studies and philosophy of technology; awareness of methodological problems and considerations, validity, epistemologies, and interdisciplinarity.</li> <li>Introduction to research design and the rhetoric of a project paper, formulation of research questions, interplays between research questions, methods, theories, empirical data and analysis.</li> </ul> <p> </p> <ul> <li>Understand a general definition of research design</li> <li>Recognize the ethical issues involved in research, and practice ethical research standards</li> <li>Know the primary characteristics of quantitative, qualitative and mixed-methods.</li> <li>Design an appropriate method research study to answer a digitally-related research question.</li> <li>Choose appropriate quantitative, qualitative or mixed-method to collect data.</li> <li>Construct a coherent exam paper that includes an abstract, introduction, literature review, research questions, ethical considerations, and methodology.</li> </ul> <h3>ECTS</h3> <p><strong>Aim of the course</strong></p> <p>The course Digital Technologies and Data-Driven Business constitutes a core foundation course that provides the necessary understanding of digital technologies and the role of data in 21<sup>st</sup> century businesses and organizations. The course is an introductory level course.</p> <p><strong>Course content</strong></p> <p>The growing phenomenon of digitalization brings about profound changes in society and in businesses. Digital technologies and the explosion of data are transforming virtually every aspect of how industries evolve, how businesses deliver value, and how consumers behave.</p> <p>This course investigates the link between the capabilities of digital technologies and the activities and objectives of business organizations. In the course, we examine the technological foundations (systems, software, and databases) of business organizations, and investigate how the capabilities and limitations of digital technologies shape opportunities for business value creation for organizations, entire industries, and society at large. To this effect, we focus on how to develop data-driven solutions in business, by providing skills of extracting value from data through data programming and data analytics.</p> <h3>Learning Objectives</h3> <ul> <li>Apply basic concepts and practices of data-driven analytics for managerial purposes</li> <li>Evaluate the use of digital technologies and data for managing business organizations</li> <li>Critically reflect on the impact of digital technology and data on contemporary business and society</li> </ul> <h3>ECTS</h3> <h3>Managing Communication, Marketing and Relations</h3> <p>In this course, students will be introduced to key theories and discussions in communications, media and marketing studies in order to gain conceptual and analytical tools that can help unpack the role of digital media and data in communication, marketing and business-society relations.</p> <p>In order to grasp the role and logics of digital media and data, including their opportunities and challenges for different societal actors, the course examines these in relation to technological affordances, discourses, practices and wider societal power structures.</p> <p> </p> <h3>Learning Objectives</h3> <ul> <li>Identify and critically reflect on issues related to the management of communication, marketing and relations</li> <li>Select relevant theory and cases for the conceptualisation and analysis of the logics and practices of digital media and data in communication, marketing and business-society relations</li> <li>Discuss and reflect on opportunities and challenges in relation to the role of digital media and data to communication, marketing and business-society relations</li> </ul> <h3>ECTS</h3> <h3>Corporate Finance</h3> <p>This is an introductory course in finance focusing on corporate applications in the international environment. It covers the basic theories of interest rates, valuation of streams of cash flows, and pricing of risk, and it draws practical implications for capital structure, project valuation, financing, and risk management.</p> <p>More specifically, the course contains a basic introduction to topics such as:</p> <ul> <li>The main characteristics of corporations</li> <li>The relationship between accounting information and the information analyzed in corporate finance</li> <li>Interest rates and the time value of money</li> <li>The valuation of bonds and stocks</li> <li>The investment decision</li> <li>Payout policy</li> <li>Financial and real options</li> </ul> <ul> <li>­Calculate, interpret and compare financial statistics, prices, returns and costs</li> <li>Elaborate, present and discuss solutions for financial decision problems</li> </ul> <h3>ECTS</h3> <h3>Knowledge, Leadership, and Change</h3> <p>This course prepares students for careers as effective managers by exploring the key practical and conceptual tasks and challenges facing knowledge workers and knowledge work. These challenges include organizing work as a series of diverse and challenging projects; managing project portfolios; negotiating work tasks with experts, professionals, and knowledge workers; maintaining integration in very diverse workplaces; and grappling with uncertainty and change. The course stresses that in such contexts, the strategic, organisational and cultural aspects of management practice always intersect and overlap. At the same time, the course explores several theories that link these dynamics together. The course further pursues the notion that management practices rooted in industrial regimes of production increasingly have been superseded in many instances by new management practices that foreground leadership, culture and the regulation of identity. The course therefore includes discussion of those aspects of organisational life that are often marginalised in standard texts, including the politics and complexities of managerial decision-making, the roles played by ordinary human interaction, and relationships in organizational settings.</p> <p> </p> <ul> <li>Understanding the nature of complexity in work organisation</li> <li>Understand, apply and reflect upon the concepts of project and project management</li> <li>Understand and reflect upon the role of leadership in complex work and knowledge work</li> <li>Understand and reflect upon the role of interaction and relationship in complex work and knowledge work</li> </ul> <h3>ECTS</h3> <h3>Bachelor Project</h3> <p>The Bachelor Project concludes the undergraduate programme. The objectives of the Bachelor Project are a continuation of the overall DM programme.</p> <p> </p> <p>In the bachelor project students have an opportunity to explore an issue of interest within an interdisciplinary social science, research-oriented, participatory educational framework.</p> <p> </p> <p>Students are encouraged to build on knowledge already acquired during the programme and, if possible, to choose their research question in collaboration with an organisation or corporation. The research question may benefit from problems and issues experienced during students’ internship, if the student has participated in an internship programme.</p> <p> </p> <p> </p> <h3>Learning Objectives</h3> <ul> <li>Display knowledge of the field of Business Administration and Digital Management as represented by the topics and approaches covered in the BSc DM programme, including deeper insight into current research on datafication.</li> <li>Define a clear and consistent research issue and/or question with specific focus on the theme: “Digital Management and Business Administration.”</li> <li>Justify and critically explain the theoretical basis and analytical framework deployed.</li> <li>Explain and evaluate the chosen research method for the project.</li> <li>Describe and evaluate the primary and/or secondary data sources used.</li> <li>Evaluate the impact of the research findings for the target organization and/or academic fields.</li> </ul> <h3>ECTS</h3> <h3>Regulation and Governance of Digital Business</h3> <p>The course offers an introduction to the most significant issues about the regulation and governance of digital business. It provides an encompassing and overall view about key aspects that regulate and govern the context in which businesses develop digital solutions and the context in which digital-based new business models operate. In so doing, the course develops the analytical skills of the students in terms of understanding, describing, and explaining the relevance of these different aspects of regulation and governance of digital matters, as an essential context for digital business management. The course will also put particular attention to the legal and to the ethical responsibility of digital business, which are interrelated but also distinct issues. The course will deal, among others, with issues like: data privacy regulations and compliance, digital business and intellectual property rights, global Internet governance, digital infrastructure, public and private dimensions of cybersecurity, and ethics and responsibility in the digital era.</p> <h3>Learning Objectives</h3> <p>After completing the course the students should be able to:</p> <ul> <li>Describe and explain the relevance of regulatory and governance frameworks for the development of digital business solutions, and of digital-based business models</li> <li>Compare, evaluate and discuss the different situations in which business might find itself in relation to the regulation and governance of digital matters</li> <li>Discuss and reflect critically about business opportunities and challenges offered by developments in the regulation and governance of digital matters.</li> <li>Understand and reflect about different dimensions of the legal and of the ethical responsibility of digital business</li> </ul> <h3>ECTS</h3> <h3>Business Data Analytics, Quantitative Methods and Visualization</h3> <p>This course is designed to equip students with practical knowledge of tools and techniques for the exploration, analysis and visualization of data in business. It also deals with conceptual, societal and ethical issues associated with these techniques. </p> <p> </p> <p>The course has a <em>blended</em> format, with some lectures presented online, together with associated online activities. In addition, there will be regular hands-on lab sessions. The course includes an independently chosen project, which will  take the form of a business case analysis. Students will select a dataset, to which they apply data science techniques, building relevant models and assessing them from a business and data science perspective.</p> <p> </p> <ul> <li>Basic techniques for analysis of structured data, including use of query languages</li> <li>Basic machine learning tools and techniques, including classification and regression, as well as unsupervised methods such as clustering</li> <li>Techniques for visualization and presentation of the results of data analysis</li> <li>Conceptual, societal and ethical issues with business data analytics</li> </ul> <h3>Learning Objectives</h3> <ul> <li>Understand and deploy basic machine learning techniques for classification and regression</li> <li>Understand and deploy techniques for visualizing and presenting results of data analytics</li> <li>Demonstrate an analytical understanding of business, societal, and ethical issues in the application of data analysis techniques</li> </ul> <h3>ECTS</h3> <h3>Globalisation, Outsourcing and Virtual Organising</h3> <p>This course will take its point of departure in the global restructuring of industries and look at how offshoring and outsourcing of work can be managed through virtual platforms and virtual teamwork..</p> <p> </p> <p>The scene will be set with lectures about developments at the macro-level, about the three waves of globalization and the move from global value chains to global production and innovation networks.  These introductory lectures aim to give the students an understanding of how industries are developing global production and innovation networks, a development that creates a need for virtual organizing. They also draw attention to the fact that firms must learn to govern activities that are globally dispersed, either internally through strategies of offshoring and foreign direct investments or externally through outsourcing. In an exercise the students will look more into where value is created in the global networks, the socalled ’smile of value creation’. This exercise will draw on empirical cases about just-in-time production and distributed chains in virtual organizations.</p> <p> </p> <p>The second part of the course deals with global virtual collaboration and boundary spanning at a team level. It introduces literature dealing with key issues related to global virtual work: choice of common language, choice of communication technologies and media, perceived cultural differences and conditions for trust-building. This section also serves as an introduction to the X-culture project, an activity that runs parallel to lectures and exercises and where all students over a period of 8 weeks are expected to participate actively in global virtual teamwork with students from foreign universities around the world and reflect on their own experiences.</p> <p> </p> <p>The third part of the course focuses on the organizational level and deals with how production and innovation is increasingly organized in global networks.  We will look into specific firms that have developed digital platforms for their internal innovation practices or developed models for open innovation and how they deal with challenges of virtual coordination and communication. We will also look into the construction of global communities of practice and distributed and coordinated learning processes and critically assess the limits to virtual organizing. This section draws on literature on organizational learning and knowledge sharing and brings in the perspective of globalization into this literature of economic sociology.</p> <p> </p> <p>Techniques for different levels of oral presentation (elevator pitch, coffee pitch and board of directors pitch) as well as peer-to-peer feedback will be trained in exercises.</p> <p> </p> <p>Along the lectures and exercises, students will be allocated their own global virtual teams for solving cases and experiment with virtual organizing of work across borders and boundaries. This socalled X-culture teamwork with a duration of eight weeks will take place online.  </p> <h3>Learning Objectives</h3> <ul> <li>Identify and analyze challenges companies and their employees are facing in globalization processes</li> <li>Demonstrate an overview of how virtual platforms and designs may facilitate globalization processes and potentially overcome the challenges individuals and companies face</li> <li>Select relevant theory to conceptualize, analyze and critically assess practices of virtual organization in a case study of an organization of own choice</li> <li>Demonstrate understanding of the characteristics of virtual organizing and virtual teamwork</li> <li>Demonstrate understanding of the role of social interaction and perceived cultural differences in global virtual work relations</li> <li>Discuss and reflect upon the use of digital technologies in global organizing of a company´s internally and externally dispersed activities</li> </ul> <h3>ECTS</h3> <h3>Business Models and Value Chains in the Digital Economy</h3> <table> <tbody> <tr> <td> <p>The proliferation of digital technologies has a significant impact on the business models and traditional value chains.  Digital platforms with international impact, such as Google, Amazon, Facebook are building digital ecosystems challenging existing business models and value chains. The course starts by introducing the logic behind traditional business models and value chains. Then, the course explains the digital trends which lead to new value creation structures,  enabled by digital platforms. Traditional value chains are replaced and new digital business models emerge. The course also presents strategic tools for supporting traditional businesses experiencing  digital transformation. Concepts, models, and economic principles that are useful in analyzing the digital business models and digital structures of value creation will be taught and applied on real-life cases.</p> <p> </p> </td> </tr> </tbody> </table> <ul> <li>Describe and apply business model concepts for start-ups in the digital environment</li> <li>Explain the challenges of digital transformation in relation to business models and value chains</li> <li>Reflect on on the of digital business models and value chains of organizations competing in the digital arena</li> </ul> <h3>ECTS</h3> <h3>Digital Organization</h3> <p>The course is designed to provide students with analytical tools and capabilities that will allow them to examine comprehensively the task of establishing well-functioning organizations. The course promotes the view that theorizing is an important organizational practice and that knowledge of alternatives and their consequences is the key for understanding organization and organized action. Successfully turning theory into a practical resource or tool for further theorizing requires an ability to appreciate differences among the various theories. This includes furthering the ability to discuss and critically reflect upon the theories and their different – sometimes competing – assumptions, while paying due attention to their possible practical relevance and implications. This is a hands-on course that requires students' engagement. Attendance and active participation in class discussions are not only expected but also required for one's successful realization of the course learning objectives.</p> <p> </p> <p>The course covers theories related to organizational structure, technology, culture, decision-making and management, among others. Digitalization and its impact on organizing will be considered as a running theme throughout the course. </p> <h3>Learning Objectives</h3> <ul> <li>Ability to describe the organizational theories in the required course readings as well as class presentations and to discuss the strengths and weaknesses of those theories.</li> <li>Ability to illustrate ideas from organizational theories in a digital context by examples from the exam case.</li> <li>Ability to carry out critical assessment of the scope of alternative organizational theories and to compare their relevance to the exam case.</li> <li>Ability to gain new insights through a selective application of multiple theories in a critical assessment of the exam case.</li> </ul> <h3>ECTS</h3> <h3>Technology and Societal Transformations</h3> <p>Taking an encompassing and interdisciplinary approach to the study of  technological and socio-political transformations, this course brings together a range of theoretical and analytical perspectives. The course both zooms out to offer more theoretical accounts of digitalization and datafication, and zooms in on the importance of theory in empirical and strategic work.</p> <p>This course focuses on questions about the intersection of technology and societal transformations and offers students an opportunity to develop, formulate and design an academic analysis based on a research question of their own choice. The course provides an overview of theoretical discussions about digital transformations and societal developments, and uses these as a starting point for developing research questions, project designs and theoretical and methodological frameworks for the study and analysis of digital transformations. The focus on linking theories to research project design and analysis means that the course opens up questions about research methods and theories of science.</p> <h3>Learning Objectives</h3> <ul> <li>argue for the relevance of the chosen theories</li> <li>develop a research question and research design for a project on technology and society</li> <li>use theories about technology and societal transformations from readings as a starting point for empirical research</li> </ul> <h3> </h3> Tue, 02/18/2020 - 11:52 1430547 1430547